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Photos: 2016 Soul Train Awards

Head of CBS News to speak at research group's luncheon

The head of the CBS News is scheduled to speak Nov. 30 in New Orleans.

David Rhodes will appear Wednesday at the Marriott during a luncheon hosted by Bureau of Governmental Research.

Rhodes oversees television, digital and radio news at the network, including such shows as "CBS Evening News" and "60 Minutes."

The Bureau of Government Research is an independent organization that analyzes government policies, ethics issues, amendments or budgets in the New Orleans area and presents public reports.

Ron Glass, actor known for roles in 'Barney Miller,' 'Firefly,' dead at 71

Ron Glass, a television actor best known for his roles as Detective Ron Harris on the sitcom "Barney Miller" and Shepherd Derrial Book in the 2002 science fiction series "Firefly," has died, according to multiple reports. He was 71 years old.

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Glass' representative confirmed the actor's death to Variety on Saturday. Additional details were not immediately available.

Glass made his first television appearance on "Sanford and Son" in 1972. His prolific resume includes appearances on "Family Matters," "The Twilight Zone," "Murder, She Wrote" and "Friends." He also did voice acting for a number of shows, including "Rugrats" and "The Proud Family."

He landed the role of Harris, an ambitious detective, on "Barney Miller" in 1975, a role he held until the show's end in 1982. He landed a regular role as the spiritual Book in the short-lived 2002 series "Firefly." He reprised the role for the 2005 movie "Serenity," a continuation of "Firefly."

In a 2007 interview on "The American Perspective," Glass called his career "very fulfilling." He learned that he wanted to become an actor while attending the University of Evansville in Indiana, when a professor encouraged him to read for a play because he liked the sound of Glass' voice.

"I've had the opportunity to do a lot of things that I never thought I'd be able to do," Glass told host Judyth Piazza. "For example, being a part of a -- I guess you would call it kind of a cult success -- as far as science fiction is concerned. … It never occurred to me that, that kind of genre would be something that I would be successful in."

Glass said that throughout his career, he had been fortunate to play characters that make people happy.

"The best thing is being able to feel like I have been able to touch people, and been able to make people happy, actually. You know, by doing the work that I do," he said on "The American Perspective."

Ron Glass, co-star of TV's 'Barney Miller' dead at 71

Ron Glass, the handsome, prolific character actor best known for his role as the gregarious, sometimes sardonic detective Ron Harris in the long-running cop comedy "Barney Miller," has died at age 71.

Glass died Friday of respiratory failure, his agent, Jeffrey Leavett, told The Associated Press on Saturday.

"Ron was a private, gentle and caring man," said Leavett, a longtime friend of the actor. "He was an absolute delight to watch on screen. Words cannot adequately express my sorrow. "

Although best known for "Barney Miller," Glass appeared in dozens of other shows in a television and film career dating to the early 1970s.

He portrayed Derrial Book, the spiritual shepherd with a cloudy past in the 2002 science-fiction series Firefly" and its 2005 film sequel "Serenity."

He was Felix Unger opposite Desmond Wilson's Oscar Madison in "The New Odd Couple," a 1980s reboot of the original Broadway show, film and television series that this time cast black actors in the lead roles of Unger's prissy neat freak forced to share an apartment with slovenly friend Madison.

Glass was also the voice of Randy Carmichael, the genial neighbor and father of four children in the popular Nickelodeon cartoon series "Rugrats" and its spinoff, "All Grown Up."

He also made appearances in such shows as "Friends," ''Star Trek: Voyager" and "Designing Women." More recently he appeared in episodes of "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation" and "Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D." Early credits included "All in the Family," ''Maude," ''Sanford and Son" and "Hawaii Five-0."

In "Barney Miller" his literate Detective Ron Harris was one of the few generally normal characters who populated a New York City police precinct filled with oddballs on both sides of the law. The ensemble cast included Hal Linden as precinct Capt. Barney Miller, Max Gail as Detective Stan 'Wojo' Wojciehowicz, and Abe Vigoda as Detective Phil Fish.

The show aired from 1975 until 1982, winning two Golden Globes and two Emmy Awards for best comedy series. Glass was nominated for a supporting actor Emmy in 1982.

Raised in Evansville, Indiana, Glass received a Bachelor of Arts degree in drama and literature from the University of Evansville.

After graduation he moved to Minneapolis where he worked in regional theater before coming to Los Angeles to launch his TV and film career.

He was also a member of the board of directors for Los Angeles' AL Wooten Jr. Heritage Center, an organization named for a man murdered in a gang-initiation drive-by shooting and dedicated to helping inner-city youth stay safe and receive an education.

Information on funeral services and survivors was not immediately available.

Guest lineups for the Sunday TV news shows

Guest lineups for the Sunday TV news shows:

ABC's "This Week" — Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt.; Kellyanne Conway, adviser to President-elect Donald Trump; Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas.

___

NBC's "Meet the Press" — Conway; Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla.; Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio.

___

CBS' "Face the Nation" —Rubio; Jahana Hayes, the Connecticut teacher chosen as National Teacher of the Year; retired Los Angeles Dodgers broadcaster Vin Scully; John Shinholser and Honesty Liller of the McShin Foundation, which fights substance abuse.

___

CNN's "State of the Union" — Sanders; Conway.

___

"Fox News Sunday" — Ryan; Reince Priebus, Republican National Committee chairman and chief of staff to Trump.

Florence Henderson recalled as 'everybody's mom'; dies at 82

The best TV mothers become everyone's mother, with each generation claiming its own. For viewers who came of age during "The Brady Bunch" years, it was Florence Henderson who more than earned the honor.

She was partly old-school TV mom, as perfectly groomed and poised as Harriet Nelson in "The Adventures of Ozzie & Harriet" or Barbara Billingsley's June Cleaver in "Leave it to Beaver," both of 1950s-'60s vintage. But Henderson's own sass, warmth and strength made Carol Brady the right surrogate mom for the changing 1970s.

Fans of the show who watched her preside with screen husband Robert Reed over one of television's first blended families realized it. So did Maureen McCormick, who played eldest daughter Marcia Brady.

"I wish everyone could have really, really known her. But I feel like so many people, even though they didn't, they do. She was everybody's mom, everybody's friend. Everybody loved her," McCormick said of Henderson. She died Thursday of heart failure in Los Angeles at age 82, with family and friends at her side.

The sitcom "tapped into Florence's heart," McCormick said, describing her as a woman who overcame life's obstacles to endure as a stage and TV star, always seeing the glass half-full and relishing fun.

Henderson's last public appearance was Monday at a "Dancing With the Stars" taping, where she cheered on McCormick, who followed Henderson's 2010 example as a contestant this season.

"I'm reading the outpouring of love for her," McCormick said Friday. "There's no negative anything out there, and that's a very rare thing in this industry," she said.

Evidence of that came in the range of celebrities responding to her loss.

"Florence Henderson. That hurts. But she leaves an indelible mark on the history of entertainment. We love you, Mrs. Brady," tweeted Seth MacFarlane ("Family Guy," ''Ted").

Marlon Wayans, who worked with Henderson in his "Fifty Shades of Black" film parody, said in a Twitter post that it was "a dream of mine to work with her and it was all the fun I hoped it to be."

Even Boy George weighed in, tweeting: "I grew up with the Brady Bunch."

Barry Williams, who played eldest son Greg on the show, recalled Henderson as loyal and kind. She was also unfailingly gracious in public and delightfully bawdy when she wanted to be, "loaded with double entendres," he said in an interview.

On the surface, "Brady Bunch" was just another TV sitcom about a family living in suburban America and getting into a different wacky situation each week. But well after its 1969-1974 run ended, the show resonated with audiences, and it returned to TV in various forms again and again, including "The Brady Bunch Hour" in 1977, "The Brady Brides" in 1981 and "The Bradys" in 1990. It was also seen endlessly in reruns.

"It represents what people always wanted: a loving family. It's such a gentle, innocent, sweet show, and I guess it proved there's always an audience for that," Henderson said in 1999.

The family, as the show's theme song reminded viewers each week, formed after Henderson's Carol, a single mother raising three daughters, met Reed's Mike Brady, a single father who was raising three boys. The eight of them became "The Brady Bunch," with a quirky housekeeper, played by Ann B. Davis, thrown into the mix.

The blond, ever-smiling Henderson was already a Broadway star when the show began, having originated the title role in the musical "Fanny." But after "The Brady Bunch," she would always be known to fans as Carol Brady.

"We had to have security guards with us. Fans were hanging on our doors. We couldn't go out by ourselves. We were like the Beatles!" she said of the attention the show brought the cast.

Like the Beatles, there was even a Saturday morning cartoon version called "Brady Kids," though Henderson was not in that show. She and Reed did return, however, for "The Brady Bunch Hour," ''The Brady Brides" and "The Bradys." So did most of the original cast.

She was also back again in 1995, when a new cast was assembled for "The Brady Bunch Movie," a playful spoof of the original show. This time, she was Grandma Brady opposite Shelley Long's Carol. Numerous memoirs also kept interest in the show alive as cast members revealed they were more than just siblings off camera.

Henderson was a 19-year-old from Indiana attending drama school in New York when she landed a one-line role in the play "Wish You Were Here."

Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II were so impressed, they made her the female lead in a 1952 road tour of "Oklahoma!" When the show returned to Broadway for a revival in 1954, she continued in the role and won rave reviews.

"She is the real thing," wrote Walter Kerr of the New York Herald Tribune.

Henderson went on to play Maria in a road production of "The Sound of Music," was Nellie Forbush in a revival of "South Pacific," and was back on Broadway with Jose Ferrer in "The Girl Who Came to Supper" in 1963.

She made her movie debut in 1970 in "Song of Norway," based on the 1944 operetta with music by Norwegian composer Edvard Grieg.

As her TV career blossomed with "The Brady Bunch," Henderson also began to make frequent TV guest appearances. She was the first woman to host "The Tonight Show" for the vacationing Johnny Carson.

For eight years she also commuted to Nashville to conduct a cooking and talk series, "Country Kitchen," on The Nashville Network. The show resulted in a book, "Florence Henderson's Short Cut Cooking."

Post- "The Brady Bunch," Henderson alternated her appearances in revivals of the show with guest appearances on other programs.

___

Late Associated Press writer Bob Thomas contributed to this report.

Florence Henderson recalled as 'everybody's mom'; dies at 82

The best TV mothers become everyone's mother, with each generation claiming its own. For viewers who came of age during "The Brady Bunch" years, it was Florence Henderson who more than earned the honor.

She was partly old-school TV mom, as perfectly groomed and poised as Harriet Nelson in "The Adventures of Ozzie & Harriet" or Barbara Billingsley's June Cleaver in "Leave it to Beaver," both of 1950s-'60s vintage. But Henderson's own sass, warmth and strength made Carol Brady the right surrogate mom for the changing 1970s.

Fans of the show who watched her preside with screen husband Robert Reed over one of television's first blended families realized it. So did Maureen McCormick, who played eldest daughter Marcia Brady.

"I wish everyone could have really, really known her. But I feel like so many people, even though they didn't, they do. She was everybody's mom, everybody's friend. Everybody loved her," McCormick said of Henderson. She died Thursday of heart failure in Los Angeles at age 82, with family and friends at her side.

The sitcom "tapped into Florence's heart," McCormick said, describing her as a woman who overcame life's obstacles to endure as a stage and TV star, always seeing the glass half-full and relishing fun.

Henderson's last public appearance was Monday at a "Dancing With the Stars" taping, where she cheered on McCormick, who followed Henderson's 2010 example as a contestant this season.

"I'm reading the outpouring of love for her," McCormick said Friday. "There's no negative anything out there, and that's a very rare thing in this industry," she said.

Evidence of that came in the range of celebrities responding to her loss.

"Florence Henderson. That hurts. But she leaves an indelible mark on the history of entertainment. We love you, Mrs. Brady," tweeted Seth MacFarlane ("Family Guy," ''Ted").

Marlon Wayans, who worked with Henderson in his "Fifty Shades of Black" film parody, said in a Twitter post that it was "a dream of mine to work with her and it was all the fun I hoped it to be."

Even Boy George weighed in, tweeting: "I grew up with the Brady Bunch."

Barry Williams, who played eldest son Greg on the show, recalled Henderson as loyal and kind. She was also unfailingly gracious in public and delightfully bawdy when she wanted to be, "loaded with double entendres," he said in an interview.

On the surface, "Brady Bunch" was just another TV sitcom about a family living in suburban America and getting into a different wacky situation each week. But well after its 1969-1974 run ended, the show resonated with audiences, and it returned to TV in various forms again and again, including "The Brady Bunch Hour" in 1977, "The Brady Brides" in 1981 and "The Bradys" in 1990. It was also seen endlessly in reruns.

"It represents what people always wanted: a loving family. It's such a gentle, innocent, sweet show, and I guess it proved there's always an audience for that," Henderson said in 1999.

The family, as the show's theme song reminded viewers each week, formed after Henderson's Carol, a single mother raising three daughters, met Reed's Mike Brady, a single father who was raising three boys. The eight of them became "The Brady Bunch," with a quirky housekeeper, played by Ann B. Davis, thrown into the mix.

The blond, ever-smiling Henderson was already a Broadway star when the show began, having originated the title role in the musical "Fanny." But after "The Brady Bunch," she would always be known to fans as Carol Brady.

"We had to have security guards with us. Fans were hanging on our doors. We couldn't go out by ourselves. We were like the Beatles!" she said of the attention the show brought the cast.

Like the Beatles, there was even a Saturday morning cartoon version called "Brady Kids," though Henderson was not in that show. She and Reed did return, however, for "The Brady Bunch Hour," ''The Brady Brides" and "The Bradys." So did most of the original cast.

She was also back again in 1995, when a new cast was assembled for "The Brady Bunch Movie," a playful spoof of the original show. This time, she was Grandma Brady opposite Shelley Long's Carol. Numerous memoirs also kept interest in the show alive as cast members revealed they were more than just siblings off camera.

Henderson was a 19-year-old from Indiana attending drama school in New York when she landed a one-line role in the play "Wish You Were Here."

Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II were so impressed, they made her the female lead in a 1952 road tour of "Oklahoma!" When the show returned to Broadway for a revival in 1954, she continued in the role and won rave reviews.

"She is the real thing," wrote Walter Kerr of the New York Herald Tribune.

Henderson went on to play Maria in a road production of "The Sound of Music," was Nellie Forbush in a revival of "South Pacific," and was back on Broadway with Jose Ferrer in "The Girl Who Came to Supper" in 1963.

She made her movie debut in 1970 in "Song of Norway," based on the 1944 operetta with music by Norwegian composer Edvard Grieg.

As her TV career blossomed with "The Brady Bunch," Henderson also began to make frequent TV guest appearances. She was the first woman to host "The Tonight Show" for the vacationing Johnny Carson.

For eight years she also commuted to Nashville to conduct a cooking and talk series, "Country Kitchen," on The Nashville Network. The show resulted in a book, "Florence Henderson's Short Cut Cooking."

Post- "The Brady Bunch," Henderson alternated her appearances in revivals of the show with guest appearances on other programs.

___

Late Associated Press writer Bob Thomas contributed to this report.

Guest lineups for the Sunday news shows

Guest lineups for the Sunday TV news shows:

ABC's "This Week" — Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt.; Kellyanne Conway, adviser to President-elect Donald Trump.

___

NBC's "Meet the Press" — Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio.

___

CBS' "Face the Nation" — Marc Edwards, an environmental engineering expert at Virginia Tech who helped uncover the lead scandal in the water system in Flint, Michigan; Jahana Hayes, the Connecticut teacher chosen as National Teacher of the Year; retired Los Angeles Dodgers broadcaster Vin Scully; John Shinholser and Honesty Liller of the McShin Foundation, which fights substance abuse; Bryan Stevenson of the Equal Justice Initiative.

___

CNN's "State of the Union" — Sanders; Conway.

___

"Fox News Sunday" — Ryan; Reince Priebus, Republican National Committee chairman and chief of staff to Trump.

What happened to the rest of 'The Brady Bunch' cast?

Following the death of Florence Henderson, the matriarch of "The Brady Bunch," here's a look at the other cast members from the iconic TV show:

MARCIA BRADY

Maureen McCormick went to a dark place after playing the oldest girl on "The Brady Bunch," including a five-year addiction to cocaine. She co-starred in the 1980 film "The Idolmaker," toured as Wendy Darling in "Peter Pan" and Betty Rizzo in "Grease," and has released several albums, including "When You Get a Little Lonely." She played country singer Barbara Mandrell in the TV biopic "Get to the Heart: The Barbara Mandrell Story" and talked about her demons in the 2009 memoir, "Here's The Story." Just three days before her death, Henderson made an appearance at "Dancing With the Stars" to support McCormick, who was competing on the show.

JAN BRADY

Eve Plumb broke from her sweet image immediately after "The Brady Bunch" ended by starring as a 15-year-old prostitute in "Dawn: Portrait of a Teenage Runaway" in 1976. She's also become a painter, with gallery showings around the country. Her TV credits include guest spots on everything from "One Day at a Time" to "Murder, She Wrote," and from "The Love Boat" to "Fantasy Island." In the 1990s, she played the mother on the Judy Blume-based series "Fudge," and last January, appeared in the television special "Grease: Live!"

CINDY BRADY

Before she was the "youngest one, in curls," Susan Olsen sang on "The Pat Boone Show" and had a bit part in an Elvis Presley movie, "The Trouble With Girls." As an adult, she studied at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts and went on to become a radio talk show host, an artist, a designer who worked with Converse on their glow-in-the-dark sneakers, and an animal-welfare advocate. She co-wrote "Love to Love You Bradys" — a coffee table book about the horrifically bad "Brady Bunch Variety Hour" — and has a son diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome.

GREG BRADY

As a young child, actor Barry Williams appeared on TV shows such as "Dragnet," ''Mission: Impossible" and "The Mod Squad." At 14, he got the role of the eldest boy on "The Brady Bunch." Fresh off the series, he landed the lead in a road production of the musical "Pippin," put out the album of covers called "The Return of Johnny Bravo" and became a radio host. He also co-wrote the 1992 book "Growing Up Brady: I Was A Teenage Greg," which stripped the saccharine veneer off one of TV's legendary families and revealed the hardwood hijinks underneath, including affairs and drunkenness.

PETER BRADY

Christopher Knight was doing commercials at the age of 7 and landed the part of the middle Brady brother at age 11. After the show ended, he went on to become a businessman and enjoyed a semi-resurgence in Hollywood throughout the 2000s by appearing on reality shows including "Celebrity Family Feud." While on season four of "The Surreal Life" in 2004, Knight met and fell in love with 2003 "America's Next Top Model" champion, Adrianne Curry, and the couple starred in their own spinoff reality show, "My Fair Brady." In 2011, on the five-year anniversary of their wedding, the stars called it quits.

BOBBY BRADY

Born with strawberry-blonde hair, Mike Lookinland's locks were dyed dark brown so he'd look more like a Brady. After "The Brady Bunch" ended, Lookinland battled alcoholism and found a fulfilling role on the other side of the camera. He went to the University of Utah and became a camera technician for almost 20 years, including shooting the TV series "Everwood" and the film "Way of the Gun," starring James Caan. Later, Lookinland switched careers completely and now makes concrete countertops for a living.

ALICE NELSON

Emmy-winning actress Ann B. Davis, who became the country's favorite and most famous housekeeper on "The Brady Bunch," died in 2014 at age 88. More than a decade before playing Alice, Davis was the razor-tongued secretary on another stalwart TV sitcom, "The Bob Cummings Show," which brought her two Emmys. Over the years, she also appeared on Broadway and in occasional movies. In 1965-66, she played a gym teacher at an exclusive girls' school in "The John Forsythe Show."

MIKE BRADY

Robert Reed, who trained as a Shakespearean actor, only to gain fame as the father on "The Brady Bunch," died in 1992 at age 59. Reed appeared in movies, on Broadway and in several TV shows. He was born in Highland Park, Illinois, studied drama at Northwestern University and attended London's Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts and the University of London. He was nominated for three Emmy Awards, including one for his 1975 work on "Medical Center," in which he played a transsexual doctor.

Florence Henderson appeared on 'Dancing with the Stars' 2 months before her death

After making an appearance as a contestant on "Dancing with the Stars" in 2010, Florence Henderson later began popping up on the most recent installment of the dance competition.

>> Read more trending stories  

Henderson's television daughter from "The Brady Bunch," actress Maureen McCormick, appeared on the show during season 23 and received constant support from her sitcom mom.

Most of the time, like her last appearance on Nov. 21, Henderson was cheering along in the audience. Henderson was spotted during McCormick's final dance on the show, which occurred just days before her death on Thanksgiving.

Henderson died late Thursday night of heart failure.

Weeks before her death, Henderson got in front of the camera as she reprised her role of "Carol Brady" for a dance dedicated to the famed television program.

Though she was only on screen for a few moments, the audience loved it.

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