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Despite what you see on TV, Kelly Ripa and Ryan Seacrest are rumored to be off to a rough start

All may not be well on “Live with Kelly and Ryan.”

Ryan Seacrest has barely had time to get comfortable in his new gig as Kelly Ripa’s co-host on “Live with Kelly and Ryan” and the rumor mill is already churning.

According to Page Six, things between the co-stars apparently got off to a rocky start. A source told the gossip column that Ripa is not thrilled with ABC’s choice to resurrect “American Idol” now that Seacrest is on her show full-time.

>> Read more trending news 

“She doesn’t want a repeat of the Michael Strahan situation. It’s like ABC is once again diluting the attention on ‘Live.’ She wants to make sure her show is Ryan’s first priority, not ‘Idol,’” the source said.

It was announced earlier this week that “Idol” would be making a comeback to TV and almost immediately, there was speculation that Seacrest would join the reboot as host again. The network has not released any details about the judges or host at this time.

RELATED: A “Shark Tank” star just opened up about being diagnosed with cancer a year after that day

“This isn’t some spur-of-the-moment deal. It’s a part of his move to ABC,” said the source. “It’s a no-brainer. He took the job for ‘Idol’ and to host ‘Live.’ It’s the only way ABC could pay him enough money to come over.” ABC is reportedly scheduled to roll out its plan for the show to advertisers later this month.

Seacrest’s rep refuted the rumors saying, “That’s untrue. He does not have a deal with ‘Idol.’ He’s in conversations. His ‘Live’ deal was made independent of any ‘Idol’ discussions. His priority is ‘Live With Kelly and Ryan’ and his radio show.”

There are conflicting reports about whether or not Ripa is okay with Seacrest doing both shows should the opportunity present itself.

“Kelly is in the loop. She had approval over the co-host, so Ryan was her first choice. It was a very calculated decision by the network and by her. Everyone is thrilled. They’ve known each other 15 years . . . They really are friends,” the source said.

Another insider claimed that ABC plans to air “Idol” on Sundays to prioritize Seacrest’s schedule.

RELATED: Paul Walker’s mom recalls the day she learned about his tragic death in a new interview

“He’s not going to do anything to jeopardize ‘Live.’ He has a long-term commitment to the show. He’s excited to be living in New York, and this is a big deal for him,” the source said. Ripa’s rep said she’s as excited as Seacrest, “It’s all false. She’s been fully in the loop,” the insider shared.

“Live with Kelly and Ryan” airs weekdays. Check local listings.

Ludacris surprises mom by redecorating house for Mother’s Day

Ludacris presented an early Mother’s Day gift to his mom, completing a remodeling product she had started after moving into the rapper’s former home, The Grio reported.

>> Read more trending news

Ludacris, aka Chris Bridges, said he bought his first home in Atlanta in the early 2000s and decorated it as a bachelor’s pad that included his own logo on the wall. 

“At that point I had really no sense of style,” Ludacris said on the latest episode of “My Houzz.”

Ludacris told “My Houzz,” that he invited his mother, Roberta Shields, to move from Virginia to Georgia into his house. But although Roberta was now closer to her family, a bachelor’s theme was not something she wanted. So, she started to redecorate it.

“This is the first house that I bought when I became commercially successful and I never got rid of it,” Ludacris told Us. “I’ve been wanting to do these changes and help my mom out and make sure I make her proud.

“When she moved into it, she was wanting to make it her own,” Ludacris told The Grio. “But a lot of the rooms my mother has started on are just incomplete.” 

So, as a Mother’s Day present, Ludacris, along with his wife Eudoxie, decided to finish up the remodeling job for her. The couple worked with designer Rachel Oliver to remake the house, making it more modern and feminine.

“It makes me feel that I’m blessed beyond belief,” Roberta said after seeing her new home. “What I would say to them is, ‘Thank you for loving me.’”

“I feel like every child wants to do everything they can possibly do for their mom to give back an ounce of what their mother has given them,” Ludacris said. “This is one step closer.”

Steve Harvey responds to ‘do not approach me’ memo sent to staff

As fun-loving and easy going as he is on camera, Steve Harvey seems to run a tight ship off-stage.

“Do not open my dressing room door. IF YOU OPEN MY DOOR, EXPECT TO BE REMOVED,” he wrote in a letter to the staff of his Chicago-filmed talk show. “My security team will stop everyone from standing at my door who have the intent to see or speak to me.”

>> Read more trending news 

Apparently Steve’s been pretty lenient about casual meets and greets in the past, and it’s made it hard to stay focused.

“I want all the ambushing to stop now,” he wrote.

Related: Steve Harvey meets with President Trump

Chicago columnist Robert Feder posted the entire letter and strongly suggested a soon-to-be-unemployed staff member leaked it. The show is moving to Los Angeles and lots of people are going to be looking for work.

Related: What Steve Harvey told his sons about dealing with police officers

Harvey tossed a little sliver of shade in his official farewell statement, saying “The new location will allow me to welcome more celebrity guests and more importantly let me do what I enjoy doing best, being funny.”

Related: Five things you didn’t know about Steve Harvey

Harvey spoke about the letter to Entertainment Tonight, saying, “I've always had a policy where, you know, you can come and talk to me -- so many people are great around here, but some of them just started taking advantage of it.

“Look man, I'm in my makeup chair, they walk in the room. I'm having lunch, they walk in, they don't knock,” he said. “I'm in the hallway, I'm getting ambushed by people with friends that come to the show and having me sign this and do this. I just said, ‘Wait a minute.’ And in hindsight, I probably should've handled it a little bit differently.”

“I just didn't want to be in this prison anymore where I had to be in this little room, scared to go out and take a breath of fresh air without somebody approaching me, so I wrote the letter,” he said. 

Still, Harvey isn’t sorry about the letter.

“I don’t apologize about the letter, but it's kind of crazy what people who took this thing and ran, man.”

Memo to whoever lands a job on the L.A. show: Don’t try taking selfies with the new boss.

Stephen Colbert hosts 'Daily Show' reunion with Jon Stewart, correspondents

Stephen Colbert held an epic “Daily Show” reunion on Tuesday night. The host of “The Late Show” managed to get the whole gang back together again after years apart.

Jon Stewart, Samantha Bee, John Oliver, Ed Helms and Rob Corddry joined Colbert on his CBS show.

The show opened with Stewart making a large sandwich for current host of “The Daily Show” Trevor Noah, who was smashing a bunch of buttons while waiting for Stewart and Colbert to deliver his lunch to him on a silver tray.

>> Click here to watch the clip (WARNING: Viewer discretion advised)

Later in the show, Colbert had a flashback to his last day at “The Daily Show” in 2005. As he packed away his iBook and lucky Steve Carell mug, Bee — wearing a perm and sequined jacket — walked in to declare her surprise at Colbert’s decision to leave during George W. Bush’s presidency.

>> Read more trending news

“There’s never gonna be another president this good for comedy,” she said. “I mean, this guy does something ridiculous at least once a month. I know there’s one thing for sure — there’s no scenario under which I will ever say, ‘God, I wish George W. Bush was president.’”

>> Click here to watch the clip (WARNING: Viewer discretion advised)

A less-bald Corddry and a trucker hat-wearing Helms then entered and began to fight over which one of them would inherit Colbert’s office. Next, Oliver appeared claiming to be former “Daily Show” correspondent Carell.

Stewart was the final member of the team to arrive, revealing that he’d been hiding in the refrigerator the whole time. He congratulated his former underlings on “spreading their wings,” and the gang ended their meeting with their “usual pre-show prayer”: an enthusiastic cheer of “Go, liberal agenda!”

The show then switched gears and became more of a traditional talk show, with the team joining Colbert on the couches to talk about old times and discuss current political events.

>> Watch the clips here and here (WARNING: Viewer discretion advised)

'American Idol' set to return to television

Just over a year after “American Idol” aired its final episode on Fox, ABC announced that it will bring back the popular voice competition for the 2017-2018 season.

>> Read more trending news

Fox announced in May 2015 that the 15th season of “American Idol,” which debuted January 2016, would be its last.

But on Tuesday, ABC announced that it would bring back the show in conjunction with FreemantleMedia North America and 19 Entertainment.

The network did not immediately announce who the judges or host will be.

“American Idol” first aired in June 2002 and has been credited for inspiring a slew of similar reality-competition programs.

“‘American Idol’ is a pop-culture staple that left the air too soon,” Channing Dungey, president of ABC Entertainment, said in a news release.

The show launched the careers of artists including Kelly Clarkson, Jennifer Hudson, Carrie Underwood and Adam Lambert. Contestants on the show have sold more than 60 million albums and made more than 450 Billboard No. 1 hits, according to ABC.

Jimmy Kimmel responds to critics of his health care plea

Jimmy Kimmel delivered a tearful opening monologue last week on his late-night show about his son, who was born with a heart condition, and the state of health care in America. That monologue spurred an outpouring of support for the “Jimmy Kimmel Live!” host, but not everyone found him convincing.

>> Read more trending news

Kimmel spoke last week in support of the Affordable Care Act ahead of a vote in the U.S. House of Representatives to repeal the bill and replace it with the GOP-backed American Health Care Act. The Republican bill passed the House last week by a slim margin.

"I made an emotional speech that was seen by millions, and as a result of my powerful words on that night, Republicans in Congress had second thoughts about repeal and replace. They realized that what is right is right, and I saved health insurance in the United States of America," Kimmel said Monday. "I didn't save it? They voted against it anyway?"

He dismissed critics who labeled him an elitist, responding to a story published by The Washington Times headlined, “Shut up, Jimmy Kimmel, you elitist creep.” 

“I cannot count the number of times that I’ve been called a Hollywood elitist, which I’ve got to say, I kind of appreciate,” Kimmel joked. “When I was a kid, we had to drink the powdered milk because we couldn’t afford the liquid, our orange juice came out of a can … my dream was to become a Hollywood elitist.”

Kimmel blasted the Republican health care bill and sarcastically apologized for speaking out.

"I'd like to apologize for saying that children in America should have health care,” Kimmel said. “It was insensitive, it was offensive, and I hope you can find it in your heart to forgive me.”

He played a clip from a town hall held by Rep. Raul Labrador, R-Idaho, in which the congressman said “nobody dies because they don’t have access to health care.” 

Kimmel also brought on Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-Louisiana, to talk about the new health care bill that has moved into the Senate. Cassidy recently said during an interview with CNN that he’s looking for a health care bill from the Senate that will “pass the Jimmy Kimmel test.”

The Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed to this report.

WATCH: Vin Diesel honors 'brother' Paul Walker at MTV awards

Vin Diesel still gets choked up when remembering his great friend, Paul Walker.

>> Watch the video here

On Sunday night at the MTV Movie & TV Awards, the action star accepted the MTV Generation Award on behalf of the “Fast and Furious” franchise and took a moment to remember Walker.

>> PHOTOS: 2017 MTV Movie and TV Awards red carpet

“In 2002, I was standing on this stage, and MTV had given Paul Walker and I an award for best duo,” Diesel said. “And now, 15 years later, I’m with my whole family, and you’ve given us the Generation Award.”

Diesel was joined onstage with fellow “Fast and Furious” co-stars Tyrese Gibson, Michelle Rodriguez and Jordana Brewster, and got emotional when he directly addressed Walker.

>> PHOTOS: 2017 MTV Movie and TV Awards show

“Pablo,” Diesel said, “we hope you’re proud.”

Diesel continued his acceptance speech by thanking friends and family for their support.

“I gotta thank a generation that was willing to accept this multicultural franchise, where it didn’t matter what color your skin was or what country you were from,” he said. “When you’re family, you’re family.”

>> Read more trending news

The speech ended with a video of some of Walker’s best movie moments.

Walker died in 2013 in a car crash while on a break from filming “Furious 7.” He was 40.

(H/T PEOPLE)

Sinclair to buy Tribune Media, expanding its local TV reach

Sinclair Broadcast Group, already the nation's largest local TV station operator, wants to be even bigger.

The company announced Monday that it will pay about $3.9 billion for Tribune Media and its 42 stations, which includes KTLA in Los Angeles, WGN in Chicago and WPIX in New York. Chicago-based Tribune also owns stakes in the Food Network and job-search website CareerBuilder.

Sinclair has 173 stations, including KUTV in Salt Lake City, KOMO in Seattle and WKRC in Cincinnati. The Tribune deal, plus other pending acquisitions, will give it a total of 233 stations, putting distance between it and rival Nexstar Media Group, which has 170.

Sinclair said it may have to sell some stations to comply with Federal Communications Commission rules, although the FCC has recently loosened rules related to media ownership. Sinclair is also in the process of buying Bonten Media Group, which owns 14 stations, for $240 million.

In all, Sinclair said its stations will reach 72 percent of all U.S. households with a TV once the Tribune and Bonten deals close.

Jeffrey McCall, a media studies professor at DePauw University in Indiana, said buying Tribune will give Sinclair more power to negotiate better deals with cable companies and national advertisers. Adding Tribune's stations will also expand Sinclair's reach into major cities that it didn't have a presence in before, such as New York and Chicago.

"It makes them a bigger boy on the block, so to speak," said McCall.

Public interest groups, however, opposed the deal. Public Knowledge, which is typically against media consolidation, said Monday that the deal will reduce "viewpoint diversity" and contribute to the "homogenization of broadcasting." It asked the Department of Justice and FCC to reject the deal.

Late last year, Sinclair had to defend itself against news reports that it made a deal with Donald Trump's presidential campaign for favorable coverage in its newscasts. In a December statement , Sinclair said that it had no such deal with Trump's team and that it had given both him and his Democratic rival Hillary Clinton "the same opportunities to be interviewed by our local anchors on a regular basis."

On Monday, Sinclair said it will pay about $43.50 in cash and stock for each share of Tribune, an 8 percent premium from Tribune's closing price of $40.29 on Friday. The Hunt Valley, Maryland-based company values the total transaction at $6.6 billion, when debt is included.

The deal is expected to close by the end of the year.

Shares of Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. fell 82 cents, or 2.2 percent, to close Monday at $36.13. Shares of Tribune Media Co. rose $2.11, or 5.2 percent, to $42.40.

"Real Housewives" star gets reprimand over probation slipups

A "Real Housewives of New Jersey" star on supervised release following her imprisonment for fraud could be in danger of violating her probation after she failed to report two traffic violations as required, according to a court filing.

Teresa Giudice was ticketed in northern New Jersey last month for talking on her cellphone while driving, and for making an illegal left turn in New York last September, according to the court filing last week.

She is required to report any contacts with law enforcement to her probation officer within 72 hours, the filing signed by Supervising Probation Officer Donald Martenz Jr. said. That didn't happen in either case, according to Martenz's report.

Future noncompliance by Giudice "will result in the issuance of a violation petition," the document went on to say.

Giudice's lawyer, James Leonard, didn't immediately respond to a message seeking comment Monday.

Giudice served nearly a year in prison and was released in December 2015 after pleading guilty to bankruptcy fraud. Her husband, Joe, is now serving a 41-month sentence for fraud and failing to pay about $200,000 in taxes.

Defense chips away at total 'Dance Moms' star hid from court

Defense attorneys for former "Dance Moms" reality star Abby Lee Miller spent the day Monday trying to chip away at about $775,000 in income federal prosecutors in Pittsburgh said she tried to hide from a bankruptcy judge.

The amount is important because it will drive the sentence Miller, 51, receives for her bankruptcy fraud plea last year. Assistant U.S. Attorney Gregory Melucci wants her to spend 2½ years in prison, while her attorneys are hoping she'll receive probation. The judge's decision could come later Monday.

Miller's attorney, Brandon Verdream, got FBI Special Agent Sean Langford to acknowledge Miller split some of her merchandise sales 55-45 with an investment partner and that some income from personal appearances didn't take into account her expenses.

But Melucci contends that doesn't matter. That's because someone in bankruptcy must truthfully disclose all income so the court can ensure creditors receive maximum value in a repayment plan approved by the court.

Melucci contends Miller repeatedly hid her true income — as well as contracts for future income from her TV shows — until her channel-surfing bankruptcy judge saw her on TV and concluded Miller must be making far more than the $8,899 in monthly income she initially declared.

Miller eventually coughed up $288,000 in TV income she didn't initially report, then federal investigators found she'd hidden nearly $550,000 more from personal appearances, dance sessions and merchandise sales.

Miller's other defense attorney, Robert Ridge, questioned her bankruptcy attorney, David Valencik. Valencik said Miller filed for bankruptcy after defaulting on a $245,000 Florida condominium mortgage and a $96,000 mortgage on her dance studio in Penn Hills, a Pittsburgh suburb.

Miller wanted the bankruptcy court to let her repay only $150,000 of the condominium mortgage at a lower interest rate and sought to repay her other debts in full, but without interest or at lower rates. The outraged bankruptcy judge eventually ordered Miller to repay every penny.

Valencik testified that Miller didn't immediately disclose the TV income because her career was just taking off and she couldn't guarantee her future earnings.

"We didn't think that it was reliable," he testified.

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