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Work the night shift? You may be at higher risk for breast cancer, study says

Do you work at night? It may be healthier to work while the sun is up, because a new study has found a link between night shifts and breast cancer.

»RELATED: Hair dyes and chemical relaxers linked to breast cancer 

A group of researchers from Harvard University conducted an experiment, which was published in Environmental Health Perspectives, to determine how levels of light can impact the disease. 

To do so, they examined 110,000 women and data from nighttime satellite images of each participant’s residential address. They also factored in night shift work.

>> Read more trending news

Scientists found that women exposed to the highest levels of outdoor light at night had an estimated 14 percent increased risk of breast cancer compared to those exposed to lower levels. 

They also saw a stronger link among women who work at night. 

“In our modern industrialized society, artificial lighting is nearly ubiquitous. Our results suggest that this widespread exposure to outdoor lights during nighttime hours could represent a novel risk factor for breast cancer,” lead author Peter James said in a statement.

»RELATED: Study: Daily glass of wine or beer can increase breast cancer risk 

Why is that?

Light affects melatonin, a hormone that regulates sleep-wake cycles and plays a role in reducing tumor growth. However, exposure to artificial light lowers melatonin levels, preventing it from operating at its full ability. 

Researchers noted that the association between outdoor light at night and breast cancer was only prevalent among premenopausal women and current or past smokers.

They also acknowledged that more research needs to be done to clarify their results and methods. 

»RELATED: Study: Cancer partly caused by bad luck

New treatment could be the end of peanut allergy, study says

Allergic to peanuts? There could be new treatment that would eliminate that allergy for up to four years, according to recent research.

»RELATED: Giving peanut-based foods to babies early prevents allergies 

Scientists from Murdoch Childrens Research Institute in Melbourne, Australia, conducted a study, which was published in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health journal, to determine how probiotics could keep peanut allergies at bay in the long term.

To do so, they combined a bacteria called Lactobacillus rhamnosus, which is known to calm the immune system and reduce allergic reactions, with a peanut protein in increasing amounts for a process known as peanut oral immunotherapy. The mix was designed to alter the way the immune system reacts to peanuts. 

>> Read more trending news

They then tested it on a group of children, giving some the probiotic and others a placebo once daily for 18 months. 

After analyzing the results, they found that 80 percent of those given the probiotic saw no signs of the allergy after four years, and 70 percent passed an exam that determined that their peanut tolerance was long-term. 

“It would seem that children who have benefited from the probiotic peanut therapy are able to change the way that they live and not have to really worry about peanuts anymore,” Mimi Prang, lead researcher, told the journal. “That’s what’s exciting.” 

Researchers did note, however, that their experiment was limited as it only included a small group. Therefore, more experiments should be done on larger groups. 

Scientists also want to test whether the probiotic could help with other food allergies. 

“Theoretically, it should work for any other allergen that’s also presented with this probiotic,” Prang said. "I think a really important study to do next would be to see if it works in the setting of other food allergies to induce a long-lasting tolerance.”

»RELATED: Allergic college student 'hazed' with peanut butter

Couple gets engaged on live TV during total solar eclipse

Viewers of KOKI-TV in Tulsa, Oklahoma, witnessed an engagement live on air during coverage of the total solar eclipse on Monday. 

>> Watch the news report here

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news

KOKI Chief Meteorologist James Aydelott traveled to Prairie Home, Missouri, to be in the path of totality for the eclipse. He met several people that traveled to the area to see the eclipse, including a couple from Dallas. One man told Aydelott he planned to propose during the eclipse. 

>> Missouri newlyweds say ‘I do’ during eclipse

>> Read more trending news

KOKI was live on TV covering the eclipse when the man pulled the woman to the side, got down on one knee and proposed. The crowd turned their attention from the sky to the couple. Based on the tears and kiss, she said yes.

>> Watch the moment here

>> On FOX23.com: Complete coverage of the total solar eclipse

Army veteran who lost both legs to roadside bomb is becoming a doctor

Greg Galeazzi is putting on a white coat at Harvard Medical School six years after losing his legs while serving in the Army.

>> Watch the news report here

Galeazzi told ABC News that he lost his legs and much of his right arm when a roadside bomb exploded in Afghanistan in May 2011, just one month before he was scheduled to head home.

“It felt like I was an empty coke can on train tracks getting hit by a freight train moving at 100 miles per hour,” Galeazzi said. “All I could do was scream. It’s hard to put into words that sickening, nauseating feeling to see that my legs were just gone.”

He added: “I put my head back and just thought, ‘I’m dead.'”

He blacked out, and when he came to minutes later, he learned his fellow soldiers had applied tourniquets to his arm and legs to stop the bleeding. A Medivac helicopter arrived minutes later to take him to the trauma bay.

>> Read more trending news

He underwent more than 50 surgeries and physical therapy and now relies on a wheelchair to get around. Despite the life-changing incident, Galeazzi never gave up on his dream of becoming a doctor.

“Not only did I still want to practice medicine, but it strengthened my resolve to do it,” Galeazzi said.

He took 18 pre-med classes and earned his target score on the MCAT. He’s now one of 165 students in his class at Harvard Medical School. He hasn’t decided what kind of medicine he’ll be practicing yet, but he told ABC News that he’s leaning toward primary care, to be the first line of defense for patients.

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more inspirational news

He and his fiancée, Jazmine Romero, plan to tie the knot next year.

He has this advice for anyone facing adversity: “Be patient with difficult times, and even when things may be getting worse for a little while, just be patient and stick it out. Because with time, things do get better.”

Read more here.

Boys raise money to throw homeless pizza party

Two young brothers in Michigan spent their summer raising money to throw a party featuring their favorite food for people in need.

The Graves brothers, Caleb, 10, and Jacob, 7, raised over $1,500, which they gave to Degage Ministries, MLive.com reported. The organization serves two low-cost meals daily for the homeless and those in need.

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news 

The Graves brothers hosted a pizza party Friday at Degage, and invited the area's homeless community to attend. The 30 pizzas were donated by a local restaurant, so the money the brothers raised with help fund the ministry's community outreach programs. 

About 100 people attended the pizza party, according to Degage.

Research group finds 2-headed turtle 

The University of Central Florida’s Marine Turtle Research Group found a two-headed turtle in Brevard County during its research Thursday.

>> Read more trending news 

The group excavates nests three days after the turtles hatch to determine how many eggs were laid and how many hatchlings emerged. 

Any straggler turtles are safely released into the ocean.

Read: Rare shark has even rarer two-headed offspring

During its latest research, the group found a two-headed loggerhead turtle.

Researchers said the turtle appeared to be healthy and energetic, and was released into the ocean, but not before a member of the group snapped a few photos.

Kate Mansfield, an assistant professor and lab director with the group, said her crew found a two-headed turtle on the same beach a year or two ago. She said the finding is rare, but not unheard of. 

Read: Rare two-headed python hatches, survives

Boy and cow snuggle at fair in viral photo that the internet is loving

A father captured a picture of his son snuggled up with their cow, and, of course, internet users found it prize-worthy. 

>> On PalmBeachPost.com: LOOK: Child creates a superhero you didn’t know you needed

Mitchell Miner, 15, of Iowa, and his cow, Audri, had a long day at the Iowa State Fair after competing in the youth cattle show Sunday. So, the best friends decided to take a nap. 

>> See the photo here

“I was asleep. I think she was, too,” Miner told the Des Moines Register on Monday. 

While the duo didn’t win the cattle show, they did win the internet’s heart. 

>> On PalmBeachPost.com: WATCH: Man builds cat-tastic maze for his furry friends

The picture on Facebook had over 26,000 likes and 3,096 shares as of Wednesday morning; it’s since been taken down or its privacy settings have been changed.

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news

While the bond between the teen and heifer is evident, unfortunately, they are just hanging out for the summer

>> Read more trending news

The cow will be sent back to a dairy farm in Blairstown later this fall, according to the Des Moines Register

Read more at the Des Moines Register

Need relief from chronic pain? Marijuana may not help after all, studies say

When it comes to treating chronic pain or post-traumatic stress disorder, an increasing number of people are turning to marijuana for relief. However, those efforts may be in vain, because new research has found little evidence to support its effectiveness.

>> Read more trending news

A group of scientists from the Veterans Health Administration recently completed two meta studies, which were both published in Annals of Internal Medicine, to determine the usefulness of the drug. To do so, they reviewed data that linked the use of cannabis with chronic pain and PTSD alleviation. 

First, they reviewed 27 pain trials that examined the use of the plant as a remedy. They concluded that there was “insufficient evidence” to prove its effectiveness for symptoms related to illnesses, including cancer and multiple sclerosis. They did, however, see some improvement for those with neuropathic pain. 

“We found low-strength evidence that cannabis preparations with precisely defined THC–cannabidiol content may alleviate neuropathic pain, but insufficient evidence in populations with other types of pain. Most studies are small, many have methodological flaws, and the long-term effects are unclear given the brief follow-up of most studies,” the report said. 

In fact, they had sufficient evidence linking marijuana use with an increased risk of car accidents, psychotic symptoms and short-term cognitive impairment. 

The researchers next took a look at five studies and reviews that assessed cannabis use for treating PTSD. They found that the evidence here was also lacking. One portion of a study even showed that symptoms worsened for veterans who used the drug during the assessment. 

»RELATED: Veteran allowed to keep ducks that help with PTSD

“Overall, we found insufficient evidence regarding the benefits and harms of plant-based cannabis preparations for patients with PTSD. The body of literature currently available is limited by small sample sizes, lack of adjustment for important potential confounders, cross-sectional study designs, and a paucity of studies with non–cannabis-using control groups,” the study said. 

Currently, medical marijuana is legal in 28 states and Washington D.C., and up to 80 percent of people who request it say they use it for pain management. However, the latest research suggests there isn’t enough proof that it works. 

“The current studies highlight the real and urgent need for high-quality clinical trials in both of these areas,” Dr. Sachin Patel, a psychiatry researcher at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, told Reuters

“If cannabis is being considered for medical use,” she continued, "it should certainly be after all well-established treatments have failed.” 

»RELATED: Here’s what happens to your body when you don’t get enough sleep 

DJ charged with stealing cash from wedding cards

A Pennsylvania DJ is facing charges after a bride accused him of stealing cards containing cash during her wedding. 

>> Read more trending news

Edward McCarty, 38, of North Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, is charged with theft and related charges, according to TribLive.

Ashley Karasek said she only had 12 wedding cards in a collection box the morning after her July 29 wedding, which was attended by 120 people. She said McCarty was in possession of the collection box most of the evening.

In an affidavit, police said McCarty confessed to stealing a total of $600 because of “financial struggles.”

Karasek is now in the process of contacting guests who attended her wedding to ask how much they gifted her and the groom in the cards.

Read more at TribLive.

 

Dad walks son to first day of kindergarten, college in heartwarming viral photos

Two touching photos of a father and son are tugging at heartstrings across the internet.

>> See the photos here

One photo shared by 17-year-old Charles Brockman III shows him and his father walking side-by-side on the first day of kindergarten. The next photo shows the pair walking side-by-side as his dad moves him into his college dorm room.

>> On HotTopics.TV: Father and son graduate together, plan to continue their educations 

“From the first day of kindergarten to college move in. Thank you dad,” Brockman wrote when sharing the photo on Twitter.

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news

According to the Dallas Morning News, Brockman graduated from Plano Senior High School in Texas in June. He’s now running track for Mississippi State University.

>> Read more trending news

“It hasn’t hit me yet because they’re still here, but I know it will hit me soon,” Brockman told the newspaper. “I’m happy they raised me to be who I am. But I know I got growing up to do.”

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