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Coffee recalled for Viagra-like ingredient

A coffee brand has issued a recall after the FDA found it contained an ingredient similar to the active one in Viagra.

Bestherbs Coffee LLC voluntarily recalled all the lots of New of Kopi Jantan Tradisional Natural Herbs Coffee after an FDA lab found “the presence of desmethyl carbodenafil. Desmethyl carbodenafil is structurally similar to sildenafil, the active ingredient in Viagra, an FDA-approved prescription drug for erectile dysfunction.”

The analysis also said instant coffee brand contains undeclared milk.

>> Read the recall notice here

Additionally, the recall notice said: “These undeclared ingredient [sic] may interact with nitrates found in some prescription drugs, such as nitroglycerin, and may lower blood pressure to dangerous levels. Men with diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol or heart disease often take nitrates. In addition, people who have an allergy or severe sensitivity to milk run the risk of serious or life threatening allergic reaction if they consume this product.”

Now, it should not be a total shock, as “New of Kopi Jantan Tradisional Natural Herbs Coffee is used as a male enhancement.”

Still, the recall notice has been issued for the 13-gram, red packs with UPC 557205060083 on the box and containing 25 packets.

>> Read more trending news

The packages were distributed from July 2014 through June 2016. New of Kopi Jantan Tradisional Natural Herbs Coffee is consumed as an instant coffee. No illnesses have been reported so far.

The recall notice advises: “Bestherbs Coffee LLC is notifying its customers by phone. Consumers that have New of Kopi Jantan Tradisional Natural Herbs Coffee which is being recalled should stop using/discard/ and contact their doctor. Please return the product to Bestherbs Coffee LLC, 4250 Claremont Dr, Grand Priarie, TX 75052. Customers returning the product will be reimbursed by check for the returned goods and postage. Consumers with questions regarding this recall can contact Bestherbs Natural Coffee at 817-903-2288 or Albertyee.abc@hotmail.com, Monday thru Friday 9am to 5pm CST. Consumers should contact their physician or healthcare provider if they have experienced any problems that may be related to taking or using this drug product.”

Active ingredient in sunscreen could cause cancer

There's a new health warning about a chemical found in most sunscreens. A new study found that when that chemical comes into contact with sun and chlorine, it can become toxic.

If you flip over your sunscreen, chances are avobenzone is first ingredient you'll find. In fact, Boston's WFXT went into a couple of drug stores and found the vast majority of the sunscreens on the shelves have this chemical listed as the active ingredient. Avobenzone is the active ingredient in most sunscreens as it protects against UV rays.

>> The 14 most dangerous sunscreens for kids, according to experts

“I have this one (because) I bought it just for my daughter, but I don't even know if it has it. Oh, avobenzone, there it is – first ingredient. And [the sunscreen is made] for babies, so that's not good,” said Candice Brown of Mattapan, Massachusetts.

“It's an incredibly common ingredient in sunscreen,” said Dr. Abigail Waldman, Brigham and Women’s dermatologist.

>> Here are the 19 best sunscreens for kids, according to experts

But a new study first conducted in Moscow and published in the Chemosphere Journal, which is now being cited here in the United States, found that avobenzone can break down when exposed to a combination of light and chlorinated water, such as in a swimming pool, and it can degrade into some very harmful compounds, some of which are known to cause cancer.

“Anytime you put on a sunscreen or a lotion, it can react with chlorine and byproducts can form, which are chlorinated byproducts that can potentially could be harmful and whether that's on your skin initially or it's floating in the pool and you get exposed, those are two main ways of having exposure,” Waldman said.

>> Dermatologist sounds warning about social media fueled Coca-Cola tanning trend

Waldman explained that the particular concern is ingesting it, such as “after swimming in a pool and putting your hand in your mouth or sucking your thumb,” she said.

Waldman's advice is to keep kids' hands out of their mouths, towel or shower off immediately after pool time, and consider look for a sunscreen with zinc.

Mothers told WFXT that they're going to make the switch.

“So yeah, we gotta think about that,” Brown said.

Waldman also said that despite all of this, people shouldn't stop using sunscreen altogether.

>> Read more trending news

She said using sunscreen, even with avobenzone, is better than using nothing at all because going without it can lead to skin cancer.

Customers at Virginia Chipotle report illness, suspect norovirus

Chipotle temporarily closed one of its restaurants in Sterling, Virginia, after an unspecified amount of customers reported illnesses with symptoms consistent with norovirus after eating food at the Mexican grill, The Associated Press reported.

>> Read more trending news

According to the AP a “small number” of customers reported the illnesses. 

Chipotle said the company planned to reopen the Virginia location the same day after completing a full sanitation of the restaurant. 

Chipotle officials are working with health officials to discover the cause of the illnesses. Restaurant officials assured customers that norovirus does not come from its food supply.

>> Related: Chipotle testing queso offering

Chipotle’s shares dropped more than six percent Tuesday as investors responded to the incident with concern. 

Symptoms of norovirus include nausea, vomiting, stomach pain and diarrhea. 

In 2015, Chipotle’s revenue and reputation suffered after an E. coli outbreak at restaurants in nine states and a norovirus outbreak at a Boston location. Approximately 500 customers reported illnesses.

“We may be at a higher risk for food-borne illness outbreaks than some competitors due to our use of fresh produce and meats, rather than frozen, and our reliance on employees cooking with traditional methods rather than automation,” Chipotle officials said at the time

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, restaurant workers are often the source of norovirus outbreaks, as they often touch foods such as raw fruits and vegetables with their bare hands before serving them.

In 2016, Chipotle shut down all locations for a day retrain employees on food safety.

 

Do low-calorie sugar substitutes, artificial sweeteners help you lose weight?

Of the 41 percent of American adults and 25 percent of U.S. children who consume artificial sweeteners, most consume them at least once a day, according to a study published earlier this year.

» RELATED: These 9 healthy-sounding foods have more sugar than a Krispy Kreme doughnut 

And the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics has said artificial sweeteners can be used to manage weight or blood sugar by limiting energy intake.

But if you’re looking for a sweet secret solution to your weight loss woes, new research warns against falling into the growing trap of artificial sweeteners or low-calorie sugar substitutes for weight management.

>> Read more trending news

In fact, according to the new study, published Monday in the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ), artificial sweeteners (like stevia, aspartame or sucralose) may actually lead to heart disease, higher risk of obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and long-term weight gain.

» RELATED: Exercising to lose weight? Skip these popular workouts 

To determine whether or not artificial sweeteners are associated with the negative long-term effects previous studies have cited, researchers from the University of Manitoba’s George and Fay Yee Centre for Healthcare Innovation examined more than 11,000 studies on both artificial and natural sweeteners, performed a meta-analysis of 37 studies and then divided them into randomized controlled trials (seven) and longitudinal studies (30).

» RELATED: Are artificial sweeteners safe (and how much can you have)? 

In total, scientists followed more than 400,000 people for an average of 10 years, with seven of those studies (the randomized controlled trials) involving 1,003 people for an average of six months.

Here’s what the researchers found:

  • In the short seven randomized control trials of 1,003 people, those who consumed artificial sweeteners did not lose or gain more weight or see a decrease in body mass index (BMI) or in waist circumference than the controls in that group.
  • The 30 longer, observational studies showed people who consumed those low-calorie sweeteners were actually more likely to face increased risk of type 2 diabetes (14 percent), obesity, heart disease, high blood pressure and other related cardiovascular issues (32 percent higher risk for the heaviest participants compared to the lightest).
  • The longer observational studies also pointed toward an increase in BMI and waist circumference due to consumption of artificial sweeteners.

» RELATED: New study on Splenda's link to cancer sparks controversy 

“Despite the fact that millions of individuals routinely consume artificial sweeteners, relatively few patients have been included in clinical trials of these products. We found that data from clinical trials do not clearly support the intended benefits of artificial sweeteners for weight management,” Ryan Zarychanski, assistant professor at University of Manitoba and author of the study, said.

But there are some limitations to the study. For example, the way people consumed artificial sweeteners in the clinical trials may not exactly mimic how people would actually consume them.

» RELATED: Scientists say eating cheese can help weight loss 

Most of those involved in the randomized trials were on a weight-loss program, but the larger population consuming low-calorie sweeteners may not be doing so to lose weight.

It’s important to remember the study’s findings are associations, not cause and effect.

But lead author Meghan Azad, who is also an assistant professor, cautioned against the consumption of artificial sweeteners until more research is done to identify long-term health effects.

Azad and her colleagues are currently researching how such sweeteners consumed by pregnant women may impact their baby’s weight, metabolism and gut bacteria, according to Medical News Today.

In the meantime, instead of using artificial sweeteners as a healthy substitute for sugar, try to decrease your sweet tooth altogether by consuming fruit-infused water, black coffee or plain yogurt with fruit, Azad told NPR.

Read the full study at CMAJ.ca. 

Police officer helps woman, daughter left homeless over medical bills

A woman is thanking a police officer for helping her when a health emergency left her homeless.

>> Watch the news report here

Jennifer More and her mother, Barbara, were recently begging on a Los Angeles street corner when someone called the cops on them.

A fall recently left Barbara with brain damage. Her medical bills were so expensive, she and her daughter were left with nothing, leading to homelessness.

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news

Los Angeles Police Department Senior Lead Officer Sean Dinse responded to the call in a surprising way.

“He told us he understood our predicament and he would like to help,” Jennifer told KCBS.

>> Read more trending news

Dinse posted their story to their story to Facebook, and soon members of the community came together to help the women get back on their feet.

A business owner paid for a motel for a few nights for the women.

The LAPD is now collecting gift cards for Jennifer and Barbara.

Baby who was 'close to death' from blood disease saved by anonymous bone marrow donor

Baby Denniya Rawls was born with a potentially deadly genetic blood disease known as hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, or HLH, and was admitted to Cleveland Clinic Children’s Hospital in March where doctors described her as “close to death.”

>> Watch the news report here

“She was really almost in liver failure and could not breathe well,” Dr. Rabi Hanna, the department chairman of Pediatrics Hematology Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplantation, told WKYC.

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news

Robin Thornton, Denniya’s mother, said the disease was eating up her immune system and that her body was fighting against itself.

However, a bone marrow transplant from an anonymous 54-year-old saved the little girl’s life. After spending 100 days in the hospital, now 8-month-old Denniya is home on Cleveland’s east side. To date, she is the youngest baby to get a lifesaving bone marrow transplant at the hospital.

>> Read more trending news

“Bless his heart, wherever he is,” her parents said. “We can’t wait to meet him because this is our miracle baby right here!”

Thornton added, “To hear her breathe. To hear her laugh. To see her smile.”

Doctors remove 27 contact lenses from woman’s eye before cataract surgery 

A routine cataract surgery was abruptly halted when doctors found 17 contact lenses in a British woman’s eye, according to news reports. After finding the first clump, which they described as a “blueish mass,” they found 10 more. 

>> Read more trending news 

The 67-year-old woman from the United Kingdom had not complained of any irritation, just the normal discomfort of dry eye she thought was from old age, Optometry Today reported.

"She was quite shocked," ophthalmologist Rupal Morjaria told Optometry Today.

“It was such a large mass. All the 17 contact lenses were stuck together. We were really surprised that the patient didn’t notice it because it would cause quite a lot of irritation while it was sitting there,” Morjaria added.

Morjaria said the woman, who had been wearing monthly disposable contact lenses for approximately 35 years, according to NPR, felt a lot more comfortable during her two-week follow up after having the 27 contacts removed.

» Woman sues for $1M, claiming flea market contacts left her blind

The doctors said they wanted to publicize her case as a warning to others who wear contacts. Tips and advice are available at the Association of Optometrists.

Read more at Optometry Today.

» Headed to the eye doctor? You have a right to your prescription

Untreatable super-gonorrhea spreading orally, WHO warns

Gonorrhea, one of the most common sexually transmitted infections in the U.S., is getting harder and harder to treat, and unsafe oral sex is making the STI particularly dangerous.

>> Read more trending news 

That’s according to a warning issued Friday by experts at the World Health Organization, whose researchers examined data from patients with gonorrhea in 77 countries showing drug-resistant gonorrhea is getting harder, and sometimes impossible, to treat.

“The bacteria that cause gonorrhea are particularly smart,” WHO medical officer Teodora Wi said in a news release. “Every time we use a new class of antibiotics to treat the infection, the bacteria evolve to resist them.”

An estimated 78 million people are infected with gonorrhea each year by unprotected vaginal, oral and anal sex. It disproportionately affects women.

» RELATED: New study on STDs finds Georgia among ‘most diseased’ states 

Gonorrhea can infect the throat, genitals and rectum, but according to Wi, scientists are particularly concerned about the throat.

Wi told BBC that introducing gonorrhea bacteria into the throat through oral sex can lead to what’s referred to as super-gonorrhea, a drug-resistant strain that is often untreatable.

» RELATED: HIV epidemic afflicting Georgia, the South a ‘public health emergency’ 

This happens because antibiotics taken to treat the infection mix with the super-gonorrhea in the throat and create resistance, Wi said.

The rise in resistant gonorrhea is largely due to decreased condom use, increased urbanization and travel, poor infection detection rates and either inadequate or failed treatment, according to the WHO.

Read the full WHO news release.

Woman breaks for mental health days; boss' reply goes viral

A Michigan woman who suffers from depression emailed her team at work informing them that she would be taking days off to focus on her mental health and well-being, and her boss’ response has gained much attention online. 

>> Read more trending news 

Madalyn Parker, a web developer at Olark Live Chat, took to Twitter to post a screenshot of her email communication with her co-workers and a supervisor.

In an email titled “Where’s Madalyn?” Parker told her team she’d be taking off two days to renew her mental health. 

“Hopefully, I’ll be back next week refreshed and back to 100%,” she wrote. 

Parker was surprised and delighted by one of the responses she received. She asked the sender if she could post a screenshot of the reply, and he told her yes.

“Hey Madalyn, I just wanted to personally thank you for sending emails like this. Every time you do, I use it as a reminder of the importance of using sick days for mental health,” Ben Cogleton, the CEO of Olark wrote. “I can’t believe this is not a standard practice at all organizations.”

He continued: “You are an example to us all and help cut through the stigma so we can all bring our whole selves to work.”  

Parker’s post of the conversation garnered more than 34,000 likes on Twitter and sparked conversations about companies’ obligation to provide mental health days.

“It’s 2017. I cannot believe that it is still controversial to speak about mental health in the workplace when 1 in 6 Americans are medicated for mental health,” Cogleton wrote in a blog post. “We are in a knowledge economy. Our jobs require us to execute at peak mental performance. When an athlete is injured they sit on the bench and recover. Let’s get rid of the idea that somehow the brain is different.”

Heartburn drugs linked to higher risk of early death, study says

People taking common heartburn and indigestion medicines may face a heightened risk of premature death, according to new observational research published Monday in the British Medical Journal Open.

A team of scientists from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri, found that the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) — drugs commonly taken to treat both heartburn and stomach acid — led to 25 percent higher risk of early death by any cause when compared to those using H2 blockers, common acid reducers.

>> RELATED: Differences between PPIs and H2 blockers for heartburn 

To come up with the findings, the team examined medical records of 3.5 million middle-aged Americans in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs system and compared those taking PPIs and those taking H2 blockers to treat heartburn.

Researchers did not examine over-the-counter PPIs or particular brands of prescription-strength drugs. Instead, the team focused on prescription PPIs typically used at higher doses and for longer durations, CNN reported.

According to senior author Ziyad Al-Aly, for every 500 patients taking PPIs for one year, there would be one additional death that wouldn’t have occurred if the patient wasn’t using PPIs.

And with millions of people using PPIs on a daily basis to treat heartburn and stomach acid, thousands of additional deaths could result.

>> RELATED: Popular heartburn medications may increase dementia risk, study says

Al-Aly and his team also found that the longer a patient used PPIs, the higher their risk of premature death.

Though the precise biological reason for a possible link between PPIs and risk of premature death is unclear, the gene-changing effect of the drugs may contribute to the potential problem. 

Because the research is based on observational study, the team noted the findings are “far from conclusive,” meaning they do not prove cause and effect.

>> Read more trending news

But the findings “may be used to encourage and promote pharmacovigilance [monitoring the side-effects of licensed drugs],” the authors wrote, urging patients to be judicious in their use of PPIs and limit the duration of use unless there is a clear medical benefit that outweighs any potential risk.

It’s not the first time PPIs have been linked to some dangerous health trends. Previous research has also shown links between the drugs and dementia, cardiovascular disease, hip fractures and more.

Read the full study.

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