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Josh Groban tweets, deletes snarky reaction to Mariah Carey's New Year's Eve fiasco

Josh Groban couldn’t help but tease Mariah Carey after her disaster of a performance on New Year’s Eve.

>> Watch the clip here

<iframe width="390" height="219" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/-puaW9QM7ww" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

After Carey seemed to give up on her "Dick Clark's New Year's Rockin' Eve" performance Saturday night, claiming she was experiencing technical difficulties, Groban sent out a tweet teasing the singer.

>> Mariah Carey's team says New Year's Eve performance was sabotaged

“Any time one of the greatest voices of my generation lip syncs, an angel loses its wings,” Groban joked in the since-deleted tweet, according to People.

>> Read more trending stories

Shortly after he deleted the tweet, Groban explained his actions to fans on Twitter.

>> Mariah Carey's New Year's Eve performance panned on social media

“Deleted my tweets about a certain performance because it was made in humor but taken way more meanly than intended,” Groban wrote. “Not out to diss artists.”

>> See the post here

Deleted my tweets about a certain performance because it was made in humor but taken way more meanly than intended. Not out to diss artists.— josh groban (@joshgroban) January 1, 2017

Carey didn’t let the flub keep her down, however. On Sunday, she tweeted in response to all of the buzzing about her show.

>> Mariah Carey takes to Twitter after botched New Year's Eve performance

"[Expletive] happens," she wrote. "Have a happy and healthy new year everybody! Here's to making more headlines in 2017."

Ivanka Trump reflects on 2016, shares New Year's Eve, Hanukkah family photo

Ivanka Trump looked back on 2016 and shared a family photo in social media posts Saturday as she celebrated New Year's Eve and the last night of Hanukkah with her husband and children.

In one post, Trump, Jared Kushner and their stood happily in front of a menorah.

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“New Year’s Eve + Last Night of Chanukah,” she wrote on Instagram.

>> Click here or scroll down for more

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Mariah Carey takes to Twitter after botched New Year's Eve performance

Nothing is going to get Mariah Carey down.

>> Mariah Carey's New Year's Eve performance panned on social media

After an embarrassing performance at “Dick Clark’s New Year’s Rockin’ Eve With Ryan Seacrest," Carey took to Twitter to share her thoughts about her appearance.

"[Expletive] happens," she wrote. "Have a happy and healthy new year everybody! Here's to making more headlines in 2017."

>> Mariah Carey's team says New Year's Eve performance was sabotaged

On Saturday night, Carey seemed to give up on her performance because of technical difficulties. 

>> Mariah Carey staffers ask what time the ball drops on New Year’s Eve

“Well, happy new year. We can’t hear,” she told the crowd. “I’ll just get through the moment, OK?”

Her dancers continued their routine around her as she walked around the stage looking annoyed.

>> Read more trending stories

“We’re missing some of these vocals, but it is what it is,” she said. “I’m going to say let the audience sing, OK? We didn’t have a sound check, but it’s New Year’s, baby. That’s OK, you guys.”

>> Watch the clip here

WATCH: Mariah Carey's New Year's Eve mishap; what really happened during performance? https://t.co/tEnHkiVXyy pic.twitter.com/iv4mw01njt— Good Morning America (@GMA) January 2, 2017

(h/t E! News)

Whale spotted spending New Year's Eve in New York City's East River

The lure of New York City's massive New Year's celebrations is irresistible to many – even, apparently, giant mammals.

>> Read more trending stories

Officers patrolling New York City's harbor on Saturday spotted a whale swimming in the East River in Manhattan. The police department's special operations division posted a pair of photos of the traveler Saturday morning on the division's Twitter page.

"Even the wildlife want to ring in #NYE2017 in #NYC," police wrote.

#Harbor spotted another whale in the E. River this morning right next to Gracie Mansion. Even the wildlife want to ring in #NYE2017 in #NYC pic.twitter.com/oQNbnGBirm— NYPD Special Ops (@NYPDSpecialops) December 31, 2016 <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

Officials with the U.S. Coast Guard told The Associated Press that they had yet to see the whale. It appeared to be a humpback whale, the same species spotted last month in the East River.

Police tweeted on Nov. 25 when a whale was spotted near Governor's Island.

The #Harbor Unit's PO Ripple took this whale of a shot while patrolling the NY Harbor in the vicinity of Governor's Island #Humpback #Whale pic.twitter.com/5MAoiwvTuE— NYPD Special Ops (@NYPDSpecialops) November 25, 2016 <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

Coast Guard Petty Officer Frank Iannazzo-Simmons told the AP that authorities inform mariners of any whale sightings in busy waterways and "let the whale be the whale."

Soldier proposes as revelers ring in New Year

Thousands of people funneled into Romare Bearden Park in Charlotte, North Carolina on Saturday evening, looking to ring in the New Year.

The festivities featured live music, crafts and even a marriage proposal ahead of the crown lighting at midnight.

>> Read more trending stories

U.S. Army soldier Aniel Rivera proposed to his girlfriend, Naadira Davis, amidst a roaring crowd in Charlotte's Center City.

Rivera said he wasn't phased by the crowd, but was most nervous to hear her response.

She said yes.

"I'm happy with how everything went," he said. "I'm really blessed."

Davis, who was nearly lost for words, described the moment as "amazing."

"I wasn't expecting this at all," she said.

Security for New Year's in uptown was increased after city officials declared the celebration an extraordinary event earlier in the week.

Law enforcement officials with the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department could not speak in specific terms, but said officers were brought in from all over the city to help with the event. 

The declaration also enabled officers additional search powers, and the ability to ban specific items, if necessary.

The Charlotte celebration went on in the shadow of news of an attack at an Istanbul nightclub during its New Year's Eve celebration.

A CMPD source said the department "beefed up" its law enforcement presence in light of the attack.

Photos: World rings in 2017

History of the New Year's Eve ball drop in Times Square

Each year on Dec. 31, many people across the country gather to ring in the new year, and thousands of people show up and tune in to watch the ball drop in Times Square.

>> Read more trending stories 

This year will be the 109th iteration of the tradition, which started in 1907 in Manhattan.

But the tradition of dropping a "time ball" dates back even further. 

According to Time, time balls "covered in black or red canvas" were first used in England in the 1820s to help sailors and ship captains keep track of time during the day.

The first time ball built in the U.S. was erected in 1845 atop the United States Naval Observatory in Washington, D.C. Years later, the Boston Time-Ball went into operation in 1878, and others were showcased in other U.S. cities. 

According to Alexis McCrossen, author of "Marking Modern Times: A History of Clocks, Watches, and Other Timekeepers in American Life" and history professor at Southern Methodist University, "the vast majority of clocks were put up by government entities to assert their right to control the time."

But the famous ball didn't become a staple in New Year's Eve celebrations in New York until the New York Police Department to put a ban on fireworks in the city in 1904.

According to PBS, New Year's Eve festivities in New York were once celebrated at the Trinity Church in Manhattan, where bells chimed and fireworks burst when the clock struck midnight. But the police department enacted a ban on the fireworks after there were issues with hot ashes falling on the streets.  

Walter Palmer, chief electrician of "The New York Times," suggested the newspaper's owner, Adolph Ochs, employ a new, unique method of ringing in the new year by combining the concept of the time ball and electricity. 

According to PBS, the first time ball in Times Square was 700-pound ball made of iron and wood with 100 25-watt light bulbs attached to its surface. Today, the ball has been renovated seven times. It's currently covered in more than 2,500 Waterford crystals and is illuminated by more than 32,000 LED lights. It weighs 11,875 pounds.

Each year, the ball descends 141 feet from the top of the One Times Square building.

New Year's Eve is No. 2 holiday for vehicles being stolen

It's New Year's Eve. Do you know where your car is?

No, no one's accusing you of having, um, misplaced it after a few too many adult beverages.

There's an excellent chance it's been stolen.

>> Read more trending stories

New Year's Eve is the second most popular holiday among vehicle thieves, according to a "New Year's Fun Facts" graphic compiled by Wallet Hub. Yeah, fun: In 2015, 2,227 vehicles were stolen while their owners were innocently watching the ball drop or whatever. Only Halloween, when a whopping 2,238 vehicles went vamooski, was worse.

(And don't be getting all cocky if your car's still right where you left it a midnight. Last year, a still very respectable 2,029 cars were stolen on New Year's Day, good enough for sixth on the list).

Wallet Hub's figures come from the National Insurance Crime Bureau, which compiles an Annual Holiday Vehicle Theft Report covering 11 major holidays. The good news, if there is any, is that at least 2015 wasn't 2013, when New Year's Day ranked No. 1 for car thefts (2,184). On the other hand, New Year's Eve ranked a piddling No. 9 in 2013 and has been climbing the list ever since (it also was No. 2 in 2014).

To sum up: New Year's is not a good time for anyone worried about losing weight or their cars.

Still, it appears even car thieves must take a holiday now and then: For the last three years, Christmas Day ranked 11th and last on the NICB naughty list. In 2015, "only" 1,620 vehicles were reported stolen on Christmas.

As far as anyone knows, none of them by a jolly fat man accompanied by eight tiny reindeer.

Macy's, Best Buy, Walmart: What time do stores open on New Year's Eve, New Year's Day

New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day can bring out the shopper in some of us, even after the holiday gifts have been opened.

If you still want to get out and about this New Year’s weekend, here’s a list of stores that will be open.

Remember, check with your local store as times can vary by location.

Best Buy: 10 a.m.-7 p.m. on New Year's Eve and New Year's Day; 10 a.m.-8 p.m. on Jan. 2

Costco: 9 a.m.-6 p.m. New Year’s Eve; closed New Year’s day; regular hours Jan. 2

Dick's Sporting Goods: 9 a.m.-7 p.m. on New Year's Eve and New Year's Day; 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m. on Jan. 2

Dollar General: Open regular store hours per location

JC Penney: 6 a.m.-5 p.m. on New Year’s Eve; 8 a.m.-11 p.m.; regular hours Jan. 2

Kohl's: 8 a.m.-9 p.m. on New Year's Eve and New Year's Day; 9 a.m.-10 p.m. on Jan. 2

Macy’s: 10 a.m.-7 p.m. on New Year’s Eve; 11 a.m.-6 p.m. on New Year’s Day

Target: 8 a.m.-9 p.m. on New Year's Eve, 8 a.m.-10 p.m. New Year's Day and 8 a.m.-11 p.m. on Jan. 2

Toys "R" Us: 9 a.m.-8 p.m. on New Year's Eve; 10 a.m.-7 p.m. on New Year's Day; regular hours on Jan. 2

• Walmart: Open regular store hours per location

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