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'Move back to Africa': Teacher dismissed after alleged racist Facebook post

A Mississippi teacher has been dismissed from her job after a racist Facebook post appeared on her page.

>> Read more trending news

Officials confirmed to Fox13Memphis that Cammie Rone was dismissed from her position as a teacher at Mississippi’s Batesville Intermediate School. The school serves about 600 students in the second and third grades, according to the school’s website.

>> Related: Mississippi teacher under fire for alleged racist Facebook post

A post on Cammie Rone's Facebook page said: "If blacks in this country are so offended no (one) is forcing them here. Why (don’t) they pack up and move back to Africa where they will have to work for a living." 

It went on to say the government will “pay for it.”

In a second post, Rone claimed that she was hacked.

"If anyone knows me I post about cows, recipes, and home improvements. Not racism,” she wrote.

In a statement to Fox13Memphis, school district officials said Monday that they were aware of the incident and that Rone had been placed on administrative leave. A school district spokesperson told the news station on Wednesday that she was no longer an employee of the South Panola School District.

She has the option to appeal, officials said.

The Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed to this report.

Parents outraged after teacher gives profanity-laced homework assignment 

A Georgia middle school teacher is out of the classroom after a controversial assignment for kids, including rap lyrics with racial slurs.

>> Read more trending news 

WSB-TV talked to a child and her mother Tuesday night who said she just had to act.

Mother, Crishana Wright said lessons are an important part of her youngest child’s education as Kalani Wright makes her transition into middle school.

But Wright said one assignment that came home had no place in the classroom.

"It was really against everything I try to teach them, you know?” Wright told WSB-TV.

She said she was stunned to read explicit lyrics on a worksheet that was handed out by a music teacher at DeKalb County's Bethune Middle School.

The assignment contained expletives, violence and sexually suggestive lyrics, all in print.

"I'm reading all these words, and I immediately asked her why she had this and she said it was an assignment," Wright said.

"I saw that and I was like, ‘My mom would be mad,’” sixth-grader Kalani said.

The exercise was for sixth-graders to take the rap lyrics and come up with their own positive words.

"I don't really see how you can make that positive but to say don't do it," Wright said.

Wright said she understands the purpose but says this wasn't thought out. Willis brought Wright's concerns to the school district.

In a statement, the superintendent wrote:

“The assignment was inappropriate, unacceptable and contrary to our standards. The employee responsible has been removed from the classroom and will be held accountable for such poor judgment. While we encourage teacher creativity, the expectation is that the instruction is always standards-based and age appropriate.”

"I think we all kind of know when it may be a problem, then if that's the case don't take the chance," Wright said. "You're dealing with children's minds; you have to be very cautious."

The teacher later issued an apology, saying, “At no time should students be subjected to this type of language at impressionable ages. Regardless of my best intentions, I failed miserably. I should have used better judgment.”

Three arrested in violent Georgia Tech protests after police shoot student

Anger over the police shooting of a Pride Alliance leader at Georgia Tech turned violent Monday night, as protesters set a campus police car ablaze following a candlelight vigil.

>> Read more trending news

Two police officers received minor injuries, Tech spokesman Lance Wallace said. One was taken to Grady Memorial Hospital, treated and released, he said.

Three people were arrested and were identified by Tech authorities as Vincent Castillenti, Jacob Wilson and Cassandra Monden. It was not immediately clear if they were students at the university.

Wilson was charged with two felony counts of aggravated assault against a police officer, and three misdemeanor counts of criminal trespass.

Monden — who was identified as Andrew Xavier Monden by the Fulton County Sheriff’s office — was charged with a felony count of interference with government property and inciting to rioting, which is a misdemeanor.

Castillenti was charged with felonies including aggravated assault on an officer and willful obstruction of an officer by use of threats or violence.

The three are expected in court for first appearance hearings Wednesday morning.

The parents of Scout Schultz — who had appeared earlier in the day with their attorney to question the deadly shooting — released a statement Monday night calling for calm.

“We ask that those who wish to protest Scout's death do so peacefully. Answering violence with violence is not the answer. Our goal is to work diligently to make positive change at Georgia Tech in an effort to ensure a safer campus for all students,” they said.

“This is how we will truly honor Scout's life and legacy.”

Students planned to set up tables across campus from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday for “campus members to write letters and on posters to show support for Scout's family and friends (as tonights vigil was interrupted) as well as GTPD,” according to a Facebook post.

The evening began with a peaceful vigil to remember Scout Schultz, a 21-year-old engineering student from Lilburn. Schultz was gunned down by campus police late Saturday night. The GBI is investigating.

But about 50 students left the vigil and began to march toward the Tech police headquarters at Hemphill Avenue and Ferst Drive.

At 9:28 p.m., Georgia Tech tweeted that students should “shelter in place” due to “violent protests on campus.” Officers from the Atlanta Police and nearby Georgia State University were called in to to assist Georgia Tech police.

Chad Miller, a Tech alumnus taking part in the march, said he thought tear gas had been deployed. Miller told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution he was right behind the police car when it erupted into flames.

“All I heard was metal hitting metal,” Miller said. “I’m guessing it was fireworks, there were some pretty powerful ones.”

“I was marching with them until they got in front of the police station and then all hell broke loose.”

Miller said he saw one man who may have been a police officer throwing up and coughing.

Schultz was shot and killed after a confrontation with Georgia Tech campus police late Saturday night. Police have said Schultz had a knife and refused commands to stop.

But Chris Stewart, a lawyer for the family, said Schultz was carrying a small utility tool and the blade wasn’t out. 

Schultz’s parents have questioned why police didn’t use non-lethal force.

The GBI said Monday Schultz had left behind three suicide notes and called 911.

“Why did you have to shoot?” Scout’s father, Bill Schultz, asked at a news conference Monday. “That’s the only question that matters right now.”

Schultz was the head of the Georgia Pride Alliance, which had helped organize Monday night’s vigil. The group advocates for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex and asexual individuals.

Dad challenges school dress code after 13-year-old daughter punished for 'distracting boys'

The father of a California middle school girl is standing up for his daughter after she was cited for violating her school’s controversial dress code.

>> Watch the news report here

According to KTVU, officials at Fisher Middle School in Los Gatos, near San Jose, informed 13-year-old Demetra Alarcon that the romper she wore to school recently was distracting to boys. Her father, Tony, brought her a change of clothes — jean shorts and a tank top — but school officials determined that outfit was inappropriate as well. Luckily, the father found a pair of leggings in the car as backup, but says the dress code unfairly targets girls.

>> On Rare.us: High school boys ticked about girls getting dress coded are raising eyebrows with their protest

“I mean, today it’s 90 degrees outside, and she’s wearing leggings because she doesn’t want to be dress-coded for wearing shorts. And it’s not OK. It needs to change,” Tony Alarcon told CBS News.

>> Read more trending news

He told the Mercury News: “Demetra isn’t alone. Just sit in Fisher’s parking lot, and you’ll see that. I’ve heard from multiple girls that they just want to be comfortable, but they feel like they’re being pushed into wearing leggings in 100-degree heat. I was told by an administrator that the girls’ clothes are a distraction to the boys. That shouldn’t be a concern.”

While Alarcon agrees students should be dressed appropriately for school, he doesn’t agree tank tops in extreme heat are inappropriate. He also added that it’s difficult to find girls’ shorts that meet the school’s 4-inch length requirement in most stores. He finds the regulations on girls’ clothing to be discriminatory, so he’s fighting back, saying, “You have to stand up for what’s right and that’s what I’m doing.”

>> On Rare.us: A Catholic high school is under fire for its prom dress code, which appears to body shame female students

The school district met last week to discuss the dress code but has not announced any changes. Fisher Principal Lisa Fraser defended the code in a statement that read, “There has always been a dress code. These are standards for reasonable decorum. I do reserve the right to set guidelines for the school, but I want to lead with the pulse of the community and reflect the community’s core values.”

Mississippi teacher under fire for alleged racist Facebook post

A teacher is out of the classroom after a racist Facebook post appeared on her page.

>> Read more trending news

Officials confirmed to Fox13Memphis that Cammie Rone is a teacher at Mississippi’s Batesville Intermediate School. The school serves about 600 students in the second and third grades, according to the school’s website.

A post on Cammie Rone's Facebook page said: "If blacks in this country are so offended no (one) is forcing them here. Why (don’t) they pack up and move back to Africa where they will have to work for a living." 

It went on to say the government will “pay for it.”

>> See the latest on Fox13Memphis.com

In a second post, Rone claimed that she was hacked.

"If anyone knows me I post about cows, recipes, and home improvements. Not racism,” she wrote.

In a statement to Fox13Memphis, school district officials said they were aware of the incident.

"We are aware of the alleged Facebook comment involving one of our employees,” the statement said. “That employee has been placed on administrative leave as we continue our investigation into the matter."

The Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed to this report.

Friends remember LSU student killed in suspected hazing incident

Friends are remembering an 18-year-old Louisiana State University student who died after leaving a fraternity house last week.

Maxwell Gruver, of Roswell, Georgia, died Thursday in what police are investigating as a possible hazing incident.

>> Read more trending news

Gruver was taken to a hospital from the Phi Delta Theta fraternity house.

Police in Baton Rouge are still trying to determine the circumstances that led to Gruver’s death.

“If you’re supposed to be a club full of friends and people who have life-lasting relationships, why did his life have to end so early?” said Gruver’s suitemate, Justin Franklin.

Preliminary autopsy reports released Friday showed Gruver had high levels of alcohol and THC in his system.

“It’s like normal everyday (and) the next day he’s not there,” suitemate Ty Meshell said. “It’s just weird.”

Officials suspended all Greek activities at LSU in the wake of Gruver’s death, pending the outcome of the investigation.

Meshell said he wants people to remember Gruver, not the circumstances of his death.

“Speak his name,” he said. “Don’t just let him be that guy who passed away at a frat party.”

Professor suspended after calling students 'future dead cops' in tweet

A professor at a John Jay College of Criminal Justice in Manhattan has been placed on administrative leave after he tweeted that he’s glad to teach “future dead cops.”

Economics professor Michael Isaacson, 29, caught his moment in the spotlight last week when he appeared on Fox News to discuss antifa.

>> Watch the interview here

His tweet, which read in full, “Some of y’all might think it sucks being an anti-fascist teaching at John Jay College, but I think it’s a privilege to teach future dead cops,” was roundly condemned. 

On Friday, the school announced that Isaacson is being placed on leave, the New York Daily News reports.

>> What is the ‘alt-left’?

In a statement, John Jay President Karol Mason wrote:

"Today, members of the John Jay faculty received threats, and our students expressed concerns for their safety in the classroom. Out of concern for the safety of our students, faculty and staff, we are immediately placing the adjunct on administrative leave as we continue to review this matter."

>> Read more trending news

When reached for comment, Isaacson was dismissive, telling the Daily News, “Everybody dies.” However, since being placed on leave, he has apologized for his remarks. 

Boy battling cancer graduates 8 grades in single day

First-grader Walter Herbert set an inspirational, land-speed record in academics Thursday by graduating through eight grades in a single school day while displaying high marks in the subject of bravery.

>> Read more trending news

Young Walter — appropriately nicknamed “Superbubz” — is battling cancer.

Despite ailing from his struggle with high-risk, Stage 4 neuroblastoma, the spirited 6-year-old, who attends Central Elementary, told his parents and teachers he wanted to experience graduating through all 12 grades.

His wish began to transform into reality Thursday morning as he sat in on classrooms of grades two through five at his school and later grades six through eight at Fairfield’s Creekside Middle School.

“He really just loves coming to school. He loves riding the bus and eating lunch at school,” said Central Principal Karrie Gallo, who has lead the school district’s efforts to honor Walter and his wishes.

She glances toward the back of her office door where hangs a miniature, personalized school graduation cap and gown Walter will soon wear.

“Walter has so much energy and so much life and he is so humble about all the things he has gotten to experience over the last couple of weeks,” Gallo said as her eyes watered up.

“He has really inspired the students in his (class)room to just be happy and to just enjoy the day-to-day things we all take for granted,” she said.

On Friday, he’ll attend Fairfield’s Freshman School and then high school grades ending his school day sitting for a short time in class with seniors.

His accelerated journey through the grades will end in a Friday evening graduation ceremony, where he’ll don his own cap and gown. Surrounded by family, friends, Central Elementary teachers and Fairfield district officials, Walter will be celebrated as a graduate of Fairfield Schools.

“The outpouring of support for Walter has been overwhelming,” said Fairfield Schools spokeswoman Gina Gentry-Fletcher.

“Mrs. Gallo and her staff have worked extremely hard to make this milestone happen and we are fortunate to have such a giving community of students, staff and administrators who do whatever it takes to give our children such positive experiences,” said Gentry-Fletcher.

Gallo, who had the boy as a kindergarten student last year, hovered lovingly over Walter during each of his short visits to the different grades in her school. Lessons were altered and simplified so he could participate in small groups.

After about 20 minutes in each class, she and teachers presented Walter with a grade graduation certificate.

Second-grade teacher, Kim Eichhold, made sure Walter felt special while in her class and later marveled at the young student.

“He is the most wonderful boy. He is super friendly and he brings a smile to everyone’s face,” said Eichhold, who home-tutored Walter last school year on the days when he wasn’t healthy enough to make it to school.

The school’s principal deflects any credit shown her for honoring the young boy’s wishes.

Gallo said for her, teachers and others “this is just kind of our way of paying forward a little bit. So how could you not do this for the family?”

In recent weeks the Fairfield boy has become increasingly famous for his courage and grit.

Walter was recently celebrated in mid-game by Cincinnati Reds star Joey Votto, who high-fived the Fairfield boy and handed him a signed baseball bat after homering.

On Friday he will share the practice field as a special guest of the Cincinnati Bengals.

Students disciplined for photo of them in white hoods with Confederate flag, burning cross

A group of Iowa high school students have been disciplined after a photo made the rounds on social media depicting them wearing white hoods and burning a cross in a field. 

The photo shows five young men, all wearing what appear to be white pillowcases fashioned into KKK-style hoods. One of the people in the picture holds a rifle and another waves what appears to be a Confederate flag.

A makeshift cross burns in the background of the photo, which caused shock and consternation on social media.

The Des Moines Register reported that Creston Community High School officials learned about the photo Wednesday morning. An investigation by the administration determined some of the school’s students were involved in the incident. 

Jeff Bevins, the school’s athletic director and assistant principal, declined to detail the discipline handed down to the students, who are minors, the Register said. Bevins did speak out about the behavior depicted in the photo. 

“That picture does not represent the beliefs of our school system, our parents, or our community,” Bevins told the newspaper

School officials have also spoken to other students at the school to ensure that they feel safe coming to school. Principal Bill Messerole told the Register that many students were upset by the photo.

“This certainly isn’t an issue that you just forget and move on,” Messerole said. “We want to make sure that it’s OK to have a dialogue about this.”

Messerole said that the students know the picture is not an accurate representation of what the school, or the community, stands for. 

One Creston High football player anonymously reached out to WHO Channel 13 in Des Moines to defend his teammates, indicating that at least some of the students involved were football players. 

“As a current student at Creston and a member of the football team, I would just like to make a statement,” the teen’s statement read. “The five individuals that were involved with the picture are clearly in the wrong, and they will face the consequences eventually. But I can promise everyone that as a whole, our football team and community aren't about that. The actions made by a small group shouldn't represent the entire football team and community. I'm proud to be a part of what this team is actually about, and it's sad to see something like this ruin a rich tradition we carry.”

>> Read more trending news

There was a similar reaction from some on Facebook, where at least one man defended the school and the community. 

“I saw some comments that are calling the entire school and community racist, (and) I take issue with that,” Allen Bean wrote. “Having had the opportunity to do some volunteer work at Creston High School on several occasions, I saw firsthand the love and care they have for all students. I condemn those that are involved and think they deserve severe punishment, but let’s be careful labeling this school and its community.”

In the meantime, a Drake University law professor told the Register that he believes school officials overreached in their discipline of the students. 

“This is a significant free speech issue,” Mark Kende told the newspaper. “If they’re off school grounds and they’re doing it in their free time and they’re not targeting someone in school, then this is a form of expressive speech.”

Kende explained that, according to Iowa law, hate speech is only a criminal offense if it specifically targets someone. 

The professor told the Register that the students, if involved in extracurricular activities, may have been required to sign statements saying they would refrain from behavior that would reflect poorly on them and the school. The Constitution’s guarantee of free speech could override those statements, however. 

“The school district’s going to have an issue,” Kende said. “The issue is complicated by the fact that the school is reaching beyond its typical school orders to penalize them.”

Principal accused of luring girls online for sex, reports say

A man who previously worked as a principal at school districts in Austin, Westlake and Round Rock, Texas, has been arrested in Arizona after law enforcement accused him of soliciting young girls for sex, the Phoenix-area Pinal County sheriff’s office said.

>> Read more trending news

Karl Waggoner was arrested Tuesday near Four Peaks Elementary School, the Phoenix-area school where he had just begun his job as principal this summer, the Sheriff’s Office said. Waggoner is charged with luring a minor for sex, Arizona records show.

Waggoner spent nine years as West Ridge Middle School’s principal in the Eanes school district before he was reassigned to be Westlake High School’s assistant principal in 2012. He worked for a time as Anderson High School’s associate principal, and in 2014, the Round Rock school district hired him to be Hopewell Middle School’s principal until 2016, when the Round Rock district named him the associate director of administrative projects.

>> Teacher accused of sex with students in cemetery sentenced

Authorities said they found online ads believed to have been posted by Waggoner soliciting young girls to go skinny dipping with him at his home, the Sheriff’s Office said. After finding this, a Pinal County Sheriff's Office detective conducted an undercover investigation, pretending to be a 14-year-old girl, and began communicating with Waggoner.

Waggoner engaged in "sexually inappropriate conversations" and "discussed engaging in sexual acts" with the undercover detective and provided sexually explicit photos, the Sheriff’s Office said.

The sheriff’s office in Arizona is working with Texas law enforcement agencies to investigate whether Waggoner may have committed similar acts there, the sheriff’s office said.

>> Teacher accused of sex with student, having child with him

Waggoner is still an employee with the Arizona school district but is not performing any job duties for the district while the investigation continues, the Arizona school district wrote in a letter to parents. An assistant principal at a nearby school will take over Waggoner’s job.

“Even up until this weekend, Mr. Waggoner was posting ads online soliciting young girls for sex,” Pinal County Sheriff Mark Lamb said in a statement. “Waggoner held a position of trust, spending decades educating middle and high school students in Texas. We are working with those law enforcement agencies to see if there are any victims out there. Considering the evidence, we are grateful we were able to arrest Waggoner and keep him from victimizing children in our county.”

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