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USS John S. McCain collision: Remains found during search for missing sailors

UPDATE, 7:08 a.m. ET Tuesday: The Associated Press reports that some remains of Navy sailors were found in a compartment of the USS John McCain, according to the commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet.

A number of bodies were found on the ship, and one body was found by Malaysia, the AP reported.

Read more here.

ORIGINAL STORY: The United States Navy said it will continue to investigate the collision involving the USS John S. McCain as the vessel’s damage is being assessed.

As that happens, the U.S. 7th Fleet Public Affairs said in a news post that search efforts are continuing for the 10 soldiers who are still missing. Five sailors are injured.

>> Read more trending news

“Search and rescue efforts continue in coordination with local authorities,” it said in the post. “Royal Malaysian Navy ships KD Handalan and two coastal patrol craft Petir (12) and Pang Alang (39) as well as two Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency vessels are on scene today. 

“Republic of Singapore Navy Fearless-class patrol ships Noble Pearl (PCG 54) and Noble Knight (PCG 56) joined search efforts as well.”

Navy Adm. John Richardson has ordered a probe into the collision, The Associated Press reported.

The fleet said the guided-missile destroyer “sustained significant hull damage that resulted in flooding to nearby compartments.” 

“It is the second such incident in a very short period of time – inside of three months – and very similar as well,” Richardson said at the Pentagon Monday. “It is the last of a series of incidents in the Pacific fleet in particular and that gives great cause for concern that there is something out there we are not getting at.”

An immediate explanation for the collision was not given; however, cyber security experts speculated that the ship could have been hacked, according to a McClatchy report.

Richardson said there were “no indications right now” of “cyber intrusion or sabotage,” but the investigation would “consider all possibilities.”

In the coming weeks, the Navy said it would take a one-day pause in operations to identify any steps that may need to be taken to ensure safety.

What is Trump’s plan for Afghanistan?

President Donald Trump spoke to the nation from Fort Myer on Monday night.

>> Read more trending news

“I am here tonight to lay out our path forward in Afghanistan and South Asia,” he said. 

  • The United States “must seek an honorable and enduring outcome” worthy of the sacrifices that have been made.

  • The consequences of a rapid exit are “both predictable and unacceptable.” Trump said that would create a vacuum that terrorists, including ISIS and al Qaeda, would “instantly fill.”

  • Security threats in Afghanistan and the general region “are immense.” Trump called out Pakistan for giving safe haven to “agents of chaos, violence and terror.” 

In June 2011, President Barack Obama announced that 10,000 troops would come home by the end of the year, with an additional 23,000 returning by 2012. Monday night, Trump said he was given “a bad and very complex hand.” But he added that “one way or another, these problems will be solved.”

Trump said the United States must “stop the resurgence of safe havens that threaten America.”

The president also announced the “core pillar” of his new strategy, shifting from a time-based approach to one based on conditions.

  • Trump said he will not talk about numbers of troops or plans for further military activities. “America's enemies must never know our plans or believe they can wait us out,” he said. “I will not say when we are going to attack, but attack we will.”

  • Trump said he will integrate all instruments of American power, including diplomatic, economic and military.

  • Afghanistan, the president said, must “take ownership of their future.” “ We are not nation building again. We are killing terrorists,” he said.

  • Trump also vowed a new approach toward Pakistan. “Pakistan has much to gain from partnering with our effort in Afghanistan,” he said. “It has much to lose by continuing to harbor criminals and terrorists.” 

Lastly, Trump promised military members that they would have the “necessary tools” to make U.S. strategy work.

“Micromanagement from Washington, D.C., does not win battles,” he said. “They are won in the field drawing upon the judgment and expertise of wartime commanders and frontline soldiers.”

Navy plans operation pause, calls for review of collisions in the Pacific

The U.S. Navy will take a one-day operational pause in the coming weeks to “ensure we are taking all appropriate immediate measure to enhance the Navy’s safe and effective operation around the world,” Navy Adm. John Richardson, who is chief of naval operations, said on Monday.

The pause was announced on the same day officials said they were launching a broad investigation into the Pacific fleet in light of recent accidents, including Monday morning’s collision between the USS John S. McCain and a merchant ship in the waters of Southeast Asia.

>> Read more trending news

Ten sailors remained missing Monday, hours after the USS John S. McCain, a guided missile destroyer, and the 600-foot Alnic MC collided off the coast of Singapore, Navy officials said. Five other sailors were injured.

A search for the missing sailors was ongoing Monday.

"This is the second major collision in the last three months, and is the latest in a series of major incidents, particularly in the Pacific theater,” Richardson said in a video statement released Monday. “This trend demands more forceful action.”

The USS John S. McCain, named for Republican Sen. John McCain’s father and grandfather, who were both Navy admirals, was pulled on Monday evening to Changi Naval Base in Singapore. The crash left the ship with significant hull damage, allowing water to flood into nearby compartments, naval officials said.

“I don't want to speculate how the incident happened, but this area -- it's a busy area, considering the two vessels are about to enter the traffic separation scheme,” said Adm. Datuk Zulkifili Abu Bakarthe, head of the Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency, according to The Navy Times.

The newspaper reported that about 80,000 vessels travel the strait each year.

>> Related: 10 sailors missing after USS John S. McCain collides with tanker

A defense official told The Associated Press earlier Monday that Richardson directed Adm. Phil Davidson, head of the Navy’s Fleet Forces, to lead the investigation.

The unnamed official told the AP that “Richardson wants to ensure there aren’t bigger problems that may be masked by the high pace of ship operations in the Pacific region.”

Richardson said the investigation would include “trends in operational tempo, performance, maintenance, equipment and personnel,” along with “surface warfare training and career development, including tactical and navigational proficiency.”

Monday’s crash was the second major collision involving a U.S. Navy warship from the 7th Fleet in two months, according to The Navy Times. It is the fourth accident involving a naval vessel in the Pacific this year, according to The Washington Post.

Seven sailors died and three others were injured on June 17 when a merchant vessel and the USS Fitzgerald collided in the Philippine Sea, about 56 nautical miles southwest of Yokosuka, Japan. Officials determined that the collision was avoidable and dismissed the ship’s commanding officer, executive officer and command master chief after the crash.

Army veteran who lost both legs to roadside bomb is becoming a doctor

Greg Galeazzi is putting on a white coat at Harvard Medical School six years after losing his legs while serving in the Army.

>> Watch the news report here

Galeazzi told ABC News that he lost his legs and much of his right arm when a roadside bomb exploded in Afghanistan in May 2011, just one month before he was scheduled to head home.

“It felt like I was an empty coke can on train tracks getting hit by a freight train moving at 100 miles per hour,” Galeazzi said. “All I could do was scream. It’s hard to put into words that sickening, nauseating feeling to see that my legs were just gone.”

He added: “I put my head back and just thought, ‘I’m dead.'”

He blacked out, and when he came to minutes later, he learned his fellow soldiers had applied tourniquets to his arm and legs to stop the bleeding. A Medivac helicopter arrived minutes later to take him to the trauma bay.

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He underwent more than 50 surgeries and physical therapy and now relies on a wheelchair to get around. Despite the life-changing incident, Galeazzi never gave up on his dream of becoming a doctor.

“Not only did I still want to practice medicine, but it strengthened my resolve to do it,” Galeazzi said.

He took 18 pre-med classes and earned his target score on the MCAT. He’s now one of 165 students in his class at Harvard Medical School. He hasn’t decided what kind of medicine he’ll be practicing yet, but he told ABC News that he’s leaning toward primary care, to be the first line of defense for patients.

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more inspirational news

He and his fiancée, Jazmine Romero, plan to tie the knot next year.

He has this advice for anyone facing adversity: “Be patient with difficult times, and even when things may be getting worse for a little while, just be patient and stick it out. Because with time, things do get better.”

Read more here.

5 missing after Army helicopter reported down off coast of Hawaii

U.S. Coast Guard and Army officials were responding Wednesday morning to reports of a downed Army UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter off the coast of Hawaii.

>> Read more trending news

The helicopter had five crew on board when it reportedly went down, Coast Guard officials said. Officials spotted a debris field just before 11:30 p.m. local time Tuesday near Oahu’s Kaena Point.

Russian surveillance plane spotted over Boston

An incredible photo taken Saturday showed a Russian surveillance plane flying over Boston.

>> Read more trending news

A photographer with The Boston Herald took the photo in South Boston and estimated the plane to be only about 3,600 feet high -- less than a mile above the ground and one-tenth as high as cruising altitude for most commercial flights.

The flight was sanctioned because of what is called the Open Skies Treaty, an international program that allows unarmed aerial surveillance flights over participating nations, Boston25News.com reported.

Russia and the United States are two of the 34 nations in the agreement.

The same Russian plane was spotted over Washington D.C. last week. It has been conducting missions based out of an Air force base in Ohio.

Guam releases fact sheet for imminent missile threat: 'Do not look at the flash or fireball'

Guam releases fact sheet for imminent missile threat: 'Do not look at the flash or fireball'Guam Homeland Security on Friday released guidelines for residents to prepare “for an imminent missile threat” as President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un continued to barbs.

>> Read more trending news

The release came just days after North Korea’s army said in a statement that it was reviewing a plan to attack the U.S. territory.

The two-page fact sheet suggests that residents build an emergency supply kit and create a plan in case of a strike.

“Make a list of potential concrete shelters near your home, workplace and school,” the sheet said. “Fallout shelters do not need to be specifically constructed for protecting against fallout.”

>> Related: Why is North Korea threatening Guam?

It went on to give specific advice for during and after a strike.

“Do not look at the flash or fireball – it can blind you,” the sheet said. “Take cover behind anything that might offer protection.”

During a news conference Friday, Guam Gov. Eddie Calvo said that despite the fiery rhetoric from Washington and Pyongyang, the island is “safe and sound,” the Pacific Daily News reported.

“Everyone should continue to live their lives,” Calvo said. “There are no changes.”

>> Related: North Korea, Trump exchange threats

Still, he encouraged residents to prepare, despite the lack of an imminent threat, according to the Daily News.

Pyongyang’s state-run KCNA news agency said Thursday that the country’s army would finalize plans later this month to fire intermediate-range missiles from North Korea to near Guam, Reuters reported.

Trump told reporters gathered in New Jersey on Friday that Jong-un “will regret it fast” if he “utters one threat in the form of an overt threat … or does anything with respect to Guam or anyplace else that’s an American territory or an American ally.”

US drone strikes in Somalia hit al-Shabaab fighters 

The U.S. military said it conducted two drone strikes Thursday against al-Qaeda-affiliated al-Shabaab fighters in southern Somalia, Fox News reported. Somalia’s president said the strikes killed a high-level al-Shabaab leader, The Associated Press reported. 

>> Read more trending news

The strikes occurred near the Banadiir region of Somalia, according to a statement by the U.S. Africa Command. Results were still being assessed, according to the statement.

“We continue to work in coordination with our Somali partners and allies to systematically dismantle al-Shabaab and help achieve stability and security throughout the region,” the statement said.

President Donald Trump authorized the military to conduct offensive operations against al-Shabaab, Fox News reported.

Somalia's President Mohamed Abdullah Mohamed said the al-Shabaab leader had been part of a network responsible for planning and carrying out several bombings and assassinations in the country’s capital of Mogadishu, the AP reported.

The U.S. military is now conducting airstrikes in Somalia, Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan and Yemen, Fox News reported.

Newspaper: China should stay neutral if N. Korea fires first on US

A state-run newspaper urged that China should remain neutral if North Korea follows through on its plans to fire missiles near Guam, Reuters reported Friday.

>> Read more trending news

The comments by the Global Times came after President Donald Trump raised the level of his rhetoric against North Korea on Thursday, saying his earlier threat to unleash "fire and fury" on Pyongyang if it launched an attack may not have been tough enough.

“This situation is beginning to develop into this generation's Cuban missile crisis moment,” ING's chief Asia economist, Robert Carnell, told Reuters. "While the U.S. president insists on ramping up the war of words, there is a decreasing chance of any diplomatic solution."

China, North Korea's most important ally and trading partner, has reiterated calls for calm during the current crisis..

“China should also make clear that if North Korea launches missiles that threaten U.S. soil first and the U.S. retaliates, China will stay neutral,” the Global Times said in an editorial. “If the U.S. and South Korea carry out strikes and try to overthrow the North Korean regime and change the political pattern of the Korean Peninsula, China will prevent them from doing so.”

Friday morning, Trump tweeted that U.S. military solutions were “locked and loaded” in case North Korea followed through on its threat.

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