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How disasters affect schoolchildren for years afterward

Clearing up physical damage is only part of recovering from a major disaster, according to researchers. Even when the power comes back on and roofs are fixed, a serious human-caused or natural disaster can negatively affect schoolchildren for years.

>> Read more trending news

David Schonfeld, head of the National Center for School Crisis and Bereavement at the University of Southern California, said adults don’t always see how the effects of a disaster can linger with children. 

“People may have died, and there is grief related to that,” Schonfeld said. “Children don’t easily get over it. They don’t forget it. They don’t go back to the way they were before.” 

According to the research, graduation rates and academic performance tend to drop after a disaster. The amount of the drop varies from situation to situation. 

Schonfeld said he told one school administrator the effect of a large disaster was like a runner in a marathon sitting out awhile after hurting her ankle. The runner may keep running -- even running at the same pace -- but time has been lost from sitting out. 

Read more about how children are affected by major storms on myajc.com

3 accused of looting Florida gas station after Irma

Two juveniles and one adult were arrested after allegedly looting a gas station in suburban West Palm Beach, Florida, on Monday morning after Hurricane Irma, according to the Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office.

>> Read more trending news

At 8 a.m., two juveniles and 23-year-old Austin Johnson were found by deputies at the Shell gas station 2970 North Military Trail, just north of Palm Beach Lakes and west of Interstate 95. The three were found with cartons of cigarettes and packages of beer and cigars, according to investigators.

The two juveniles, whose ages were not released, were taken to the juvenile detention center and Johnson was taken to the Palm Beach County jail. All three face charges of burglary to a business during a state of emergency and grand theft.

Hurricane Jose weakens, Katia dissipates

The National Hurricane Center upgraded tropical storms Jose and Katia to hurricanes last week as Irma barreled toward the Florida coast. Katia was downgraded Sept. 9. 

>> See the latest on Katia, Jose and Irma 

Hurricane Irma damage: 4 tips for dealing with insurance claims

As Hurricane Irma battered Florida on Sunday and other parts of the Southeast on Monday, the Florida’s Chief Financial Officer Jimmy Patronis and Insurance Commissioner David Altmaier offered these 4 tips for residents whose property has been damaged as a result of the storm.

>> Read more trending news

1. Locate all applicable insurance policies. This may include a homeowners’ policy, flood policy (flood coverage is not covered under a typical homeowners’ policy and is separate coverage) and an automobile policy (may cover damage to your car from flooding).

2. Document all damaged property and belongings. Take photos or shoot video footage before attempting any temporary repairs. When you file an insurance claim, you may be asked for visual documentation of damages. A photographic home inventory is a handy resource for this situation. A free smartphone app developed by the National Association of Insurance Commissioners called “MyHome Scr.APP.book” can help you take and store a room-by-room log of photos.

3. Contact your insurance company or insurance agent as soon as possible to report damages.

Insurance policies require prompt reporting of claims, so it is important to act as soon as possible.

>> Related: Hurricane Irma: Live updates

4. Cover damaged areas that may be exposed to the elements in order to prevent further damage.

Your insurance company may reimburse the expense of these temporary repairs, so keep all receipts. Remove water-logged and otherwise damaged items from your house to prevent the spread of mold, but document them and do not dispose of any damaged property until your insurance company adjuster has had an opportunity to survey it.

>> Related: Post-Hurricane Erma destruction: 10 tips for right after storm passes

Post-Hurricane Irma destruction: 10 tips for right after storm passes

Hurricane Irma was downgraded from a Category 5 disaster with 185-mph record-breaking winds to a severe tropical storm as it reached Georgia Monday, only after taking at least 37 lives in the Caribbean, five in Florida and at least one in Georgia.

>> Read more trending news

While the storm weakened over the weekend, Irma is still packing powerful winds and causing flooding, as well as damage to trees and power lines.

But even after the storm passes through your city, it’s imperative that residents and evacuees in Irma-affected areas follow some post-storm tips.

Here are 10 things you should do right after the storm hits or passes:

1. If you’ve experienced flooding, keep all electricity turned off.

Due to possible risk of experiencing electrical shock or fire, it’s recommended that anyone that has experienced flooding not turn on any electricity, especially around appliances that have been wet. 

2. Don’t turn all of your major appliances on at once.

If you haven’t experienced flooding, you should still be sure to turn your major appliances on gradually.

3. Don’t touch any downed wire.

According to Georgia Power, touching downed wire, including telephone or cable TV wires, can kill.

>> Related: Hurricane Irma: Live updates

If you notice any downed wires, immediately inform Georgia Power or your local authorities.

4. Never use generators indoors or outside near windows, vents.

According to Stephen Nelson, Polk County chief medical examiner in Orlando, Florida, the main source of carbon monoxide poisining after hurricanes is the power generator.

“Carbon monoxide poisoning is a huge problem,” he told news outlets.

“Don’t put the generators in your garage to power your house. The generator needs to be outside the house way far away from anything that can suck carbon monoxide into your house.”

More about generator safety here.

5. Don’t step in a puddle.

Georgia Power warns against stepping in any puddles of water after a storm, because they may be electrified. 

>> Related: NASA astronaut captures eerie images of Hurricane Irma’s destruction from space

6. Document all damages.

Take thorough photos and videos of any damage and keep a running list of your damaged items.

7. File an insurance claim for said damages.

Use your documented damages to file an insurance claim. When you contact your insurance company, let them know that you have a full inventory of your damages in hand. 

After you file a claim and the insurance company gets back to you, an insurance adjuster should come to your property to further assess the damage.

Additionally, Paul Holmes of the “Today Show” recommends that when it comes to repairs, focus on emergency repairs and leave the rest for your insurance adjuster to see.

For more questions about insurance policies after a storm, contact your insurance company.

>> Related: Here’s how to know if your food is safe to eat if affected by Hurricane Irma

8. Seek professionals for any electrical repairs.

“Let our crews do the dangerous work,” Georgia Power warns

9. Use protective gear when cleaning up.

Wear work gloves, safety classes, long sleeves and pants and boots if possible.

10. Plan better for the next disaster.

Apply for flood insurance and take other preventative steps, such as keeping a ready kit in hand for evacuations, keeping trees and shrubs trimmed and coming up with a plan for your pets.

U.S. Rep. calls Texas 'no' votes on Harvey relief 'unconscionable'

U.S. Rep. Michael McCaul, R-Austin, chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, on Monday described as “unconscionable” the vote last week of four Republican colleagues from Texas against a $15.25 billion initial aid package to help state residents in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.

>> Read more trending news

“I don’t want to judge them,” McCaul said on MSNBC’s Morning Joe. “I judge myself and my conscience and when I have people dying and hurting in my home state, it was my duty and my moral obligation to help them, and I felt that that vote was a vote of conscience to help people in my state and also now in Florida.”

“I think that’s what Americans do and I think it’s unconscionable to vote against something like that,” McCaul said.

The four Texans — Reps. Joe Barton, Jeb Hensarling, Sam Johnson and Mac Thornberry — were among 90 Republicans who voted against the House’s concurrence with the Senate’s larger relief package Friday. None of the four represents districts affected by Harvey.

Republican opponents complained that the aid was linked to a three-month lifting of the debt ceiling.

“I think having to raise the debt ceiling was the issue, and the fact is that Mick Mulvaney is the director of OMB and he was a Freedom Caucus guy when he served with us, and he told us point blank that you could not appropriate disaster relief if you didn’t raise the debt ceiling, so we were stuck with that choice,” McCaul said. “What do you (do) with that choice? Just stand on principle and vote ‘no?’ And I question that principle. Or do you vote to help people back in your home state who are hurting really badly?”

Asked if he expected a competition with Florida for federal disaster help because of Hurricane Irma, McCaul said, “I don’t think you’re going to see some Texas vs. Florida thing. This is going to be an American issue and, if anything, it will bring the Texas and Florida delegations together for that funding.”

Damage from Hurricane Irma? How to navigate your insurance policy

Thousands of homeowners impacted by Hurricanes Irma and Harvey will have to figure out how to deal with insurance claims and all the complicated work that can go along with filing a claim in order to begin rebuilding their lives and their home. 

First, what kind of homeowner’s insurance do you need?

>> Read more trending news

Some policyholders mistakenly think they need to insure their house for its resale value. You should be insuring your house for its replacement value, which is the amount it will take to rebuild the home if it is destroyed by a covered peril, like a hurricane or a tornado.

Your insurance agent will provide you with an estimate, but experts also advise paying a contractor, engineer or a trained appraiser to place the right replacement amount on a house if you do not agree with your agent or company replacement cost amount. Be aware that these expert expenses could be the responsibility of the homeowner.

In the event your home is destroyed, your policy will pay up to the limits on your policy to rebuild your home. Some insurers have what is called an inflation guard contained in the policy. This will increase the amount of insurance on your home by a small amount each year to keep up with inflation.

>> Related: Hurricane Irma: Live updates

Some insurers pay only the replacement value stated in your insurance contract, while others will provide a cushion of up to 25 percent. The replacement estimate may not take into account a surge in demand after a storm that could increase the cost of supplies and labor.

Contents coverage

Florida homeowners are allowed to waive coverage for furnishings and other contents. Some companies also allow consumers to pick the level of contents coverage. Insurers used to give consumers coverage pegged at a certain value of their structure — 50 percent was common — even if their furnishings and belongings were minimal.

Windstorm coverage

Florida statute 627.712 allows homeowners to exclude coverage for wind events in some cases. Most mortgage holders, however, require wind coverage.

To waive wind coverage, a homeowner must provide a letter from their lender that says it is all right with the lender if the insured drops the coverage. The savings from a policy by dropping windstorm coverage could be substantial, up to half of the total premiums paid.

Even so, use caution before dropping the coverage, because it comes with a high risk. It’s not just hurricanes that it covers, but any wind scenario. That would include a tree falling on your house if it did so as a result of a strong wind and not just a hurricane.

>> Related: NASA astronaut captures eerie images of Hurricane Irma’s destruction from space

Raising deductibles

An option that could offer substantial premium savings is raising your deductible. Your mortgage company might be able to veto such a move. Most insurers offer hurricane deductible of $500, 2 percent, 5 percent and 10 percent.

Florida Statute 627.701 allows insurers to offer deductibles beyond the 10 percent, but not all insurers offer larger deductible options. To have a deductible in excess of 10 percent, the home must be valued at less than $500,000 and the policyholder must provide to the insurer a letter, written in his or her own hand, saying what amount in deductible they are willing to pay.

Permission must also be obtained by the mortgage company if applicable. Calculate whether you could make repairs yourself in the event of a catastrophic event. Do you have $30,000 on hand, the amount you would pay if you took a 15 percent deductible, and your house suffered $200,000 worth of damage?

>> Related: Hurricane Irma damage: What to do before, during and after a flood

You will want to check your state's current laws before the storm hits to make sure you are covered after the storm.

Pool damage from Hurricane Irma, or any storm? Here’s what to do

Hurricane Irma barreled through Florida over the weekend and is now making its way as a tropical storm through parts of the southeast. The powerful Category 5 hurricane left a path of destruction in its wake from the Caribbean to Florida.

>> Read more trending news

Here are tips for protecting your pool before a hurricane, and how to get back up and running after.

Preparing a pool for a hurricane or storm:

-Don’t drain the water from your pool. Leave the water level alone. Draining it, so it doesn’t overflow, is pointless. If you drain it more than a few feet below normal and the ground gets saturated, the pool’s shell could pop out of the ground (even with concrete pools). Water provides weight to hold the sides and bottom in place.

-Turn off the power to the pump motor, lights and other equipment at the circuit box. Disconnect the gas from the heater; if possible, have your gas supplier or pool service disconnect it to be safe.

>> Related: Gas lines grow, pumps run dry: 8 tips to max out the fuel you have

-Consider removing diving boards or slides if you fear they won’t be secure in high winds. If you decide to remove them, try to have a professional do it.

-If the motor is exposed and you live in a flood-prone area, remove the pump and store it indoors. Otherwise, try to wrap it up with a waterproof cover and tie securely.

-Remove automatic pool cleaners, pool blankets and covers, and take them inside.

-Super-chlorinate or double the chemicals you normally add to reduce contamination and infestation by insects.

-Stock up on chemicals to “shock” pool after storm.

-Don’t throw patio furniture in the pool to keep it out of the wind; pool chemicals will harm the furniture and can mar the pool finish.

>> Related: Hurricane Irma: 9 weather terms you should know

After the storm has passed:

-Call the gas company or a pool company to reattach your gas line to the pool heater.

-Don’t reconnect electrical equipment until you’ve removed debris from the pool with a net, and power has been restored. Make sure electrical equipment is dry. Do this as quickly as possible before bacteria starts to grow.

-Don’t use your vacuum because debris will clog it and the pump.

-Then, if the area around the pool is dry, start the pump.

-When draining the pool tothe  proper level, remove cartridge filter or bypass the filter system.

-Super-chlorinate again. Remove any vegetative debris before treating the water. Add 5 gallons of chlorine (based on a 15,000-gallon pool) and start pump after inspecting electrical equipment to be sure it’s dry.

-Reset timers, if necessary.

>> Related: Photos: History’s most destructive hurricanes

-Closely watch the pump system through complete cycles for any problems.

-Wait 24 hours to see whether the water clears and turns blue. If it does, test water and follow instructions. If water is darker or black, pool may need to be drained, or partially drained, treated and refilled. Call a professional for this step.

-Balance pool chemicals and monitor for a few days.

NASA astronaut captures eerie images of Hurricane Irma’s destruction from space

After sharing mind-boggling images of Hurricane Harvey’s impact in Texas a few weeks ago, NASA astronaut Randy Bresnik has taken to his Twitter account to do the same for Hurricane Irma’s devastating hit on the Caribbean as it plows into Florida.

>> Read more trending news

According to CNET, the ISS commander’s grim footage is taken from approximately 260 miles above Earth.

Some of his most shocking photos involve two comparisons of Turks and Caicos before and after Hurricane Irma’s wrath.

>> Related: 5 hacks to keep your smartphone charged during a power outage

Bresnik snapped this next shot on Sept. 7, just after the Category 5 storm and its record-breaking 185-mph winds devastated Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic and Turks and Caicos.

>> Related: Hurricane Irma: Why you should never use a generator during a storm

Two days later, the NASA astronaut captured Hurricane Jose creeping up near Irma.

>> Related: Hurricane Irma: How to use the internet during the storm when your internet is down 

And here’s Hurricane Irma plowing toward Florida on Saturday, Sept. 9.

Since then, Irma has been downgraded from Category 5 to a tropical storm, but only after taking at least five lives in Florida.

The storm killed more than 35 people in the Caribbean.

Evacuees find shelter in Atlanta: 'I can't believe all the wonderful people'

Metro Atlanta roads were stretched thin last week and through the weekend as people evacuated Florida as Hurricane Irma approached. Many people have horror stories about the mad dash to get out of the state and into Georgia ahead of the storm.

Along with worrying about whether their homes will be standing, evacuees told WSBTV.com that they are also concerned about what traffic will be like next week when everyone goes home.

>> Read more trending news

Evacuee John Glowacki said it took him five and a half hours to drive from the Georgia-Florida line to the Atlanta Motor Speedway.

He said he was trying to take his mind off whether or not his house would be standing when he returned to Florida. Still, he said, "I can't believe all of the wonderful people here.” 

Glowacki is one of hundreds of people who have spent the last few days at the campgrounds, which have been opened to evacuees.

Russel Gorniak, another evacuee, told WSBTV.com that "a 200-mile trip took me about 13 hours." 

But traffic improved on Interstate 75 in metro Atlanta over the weekend, compared to when evacuees filled the interstate during the week.

"I hope it's not like it was coming up here, but God only knows. Let's put it that way," Gorniak said. 

Another couple said they avoided traffic on the way to metro Atlanta, but missed out on a hotel. 

"We left Spring Hill after finding out there wasn't a hotel available within 500 miles," Gary Houston said.

He said now he's more concerned about the gas supply when it's time to get back on the road. 

Most people said since severe weather is expected in the metro Monday and Tuesday, they will wait until Wednesday to head back to Florida.

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